The increased presence of bacteria in blood is a plausible contributing factor in the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this context, we performed the quantification and the taxonomic profiling of the bacterial DNA in blood samples collected from forty-three older subjects enrolled in a nursing home. Quantitative PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene revealed that all samples contained detectable amounts of bacterial DNA with a concentration that varied considerably between subjects. Correlation analyses revealed that the bacterial DNAemia (expressed as concentration of 16S rRNA gene copies in blood) significantly associated with the serum levels of zonulin, a marker of intestinal permeability. This result was confirmed by the analysis of a second set of blood samples collected from the same subjects. 16S rRNA gene profiling revealed that most of the bacterial DNA detected in blood was ascribable to the phylum Proteobacteria with a predominance of the genus Pseudomonas. Several control samples were also analyzed to assess the influence of contaminant bacterial DNA potentially originating from reagents and materials. The data reported here suggest that para-cellular permeability of epithelial (and, potentially, endothelial) cell layers may play an important role in bacterial migration into the bloodstream. Bacterial DNAemia is likely to impact on several aspects of host physiology and could underpin the development and prognosis of various diseases in older subjects.

Bacterial DNAemia is associated with serum zonulin levels in older subjects / G. Gargari, G. Mantegazza, V. Taverniti, C. Del Bo', S. Bernardi, C. Andres-Lacueva, R. Gonzalez-Dominguez, P.A. Kroon, M.S. Winterbone, A. Cherubini, P. Riso, S. Guglielmetti. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:1(2021 May 26), pp. 11054.1-11054.13. [10.1038/s41598-021-90476-0]

Bacterial DNAemia is associated with serum zonulin levels in older subjects

G. Gargari
Primo
;
G. Mantegazza
Secondo
;
V. Taverniti;C. Del Bo';S. Bernardi;P. Riso
Penultimo
;
S. Guglielmetti
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

The increased presence of bacteria in blood is a plausible contributing factor in the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this context, we performed the quantification and the taxonomic profiling of the bacterial DNA in blood samples collected from forty-three older subjects enrolled in a nursing home. Quantitative PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene revealed that all samples contained detectable amounts of bacterial DNA with a concentration that varied considerably between subjects. Correlation analyses revealed that the bacterial DNAemia (expressed as concentration of 16S rRNA gene copies in blood) significantly associated with the serum levels of zonulin, a marker of intestinal permeability. This result was confirmed by the analysis of a second set of blood samples collected from the same subjects. 16S rRNA gene profiling revealed that most of the bacterial DNA detected in blood was ascribable to the phylum Proteobacteria with a predominance of the genus Pseudomonas. Several control samples were also analyzed to assess the influence of contaminant bacterial DNA potentially originating from reagents and materials. The data reported here suggest that para-cellular permeability of epithelial (and, potentially, endothelial) cell layers may play an important role in bacterial migration into the bloodstream. Bacterial DNAemia is likely to impact on several aspects of host physiology and could underpin the development and prognosis of various diseases in older subjects.
Settore AGR/16 - Microbiologia Agraria
Settore BIO/19 - Microbiologia Generale
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
41598_2021_Article_90476.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.79 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.79 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/877978
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact