Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals after consuming prolamins from some cereals. Although the products available for celiac subjects have increased significantly in quality and quantity over the last few decades, research still focuses on identifying new ingredients to improve the nutritional, sensorial and functional qualities of gluten-free products. In terms of toxicity for people with celiac disease, there is a wide variability between ancient and modern grains. The most contradictory results are related to the role of oats in the gluten-free diet. In order to clarify the role of minor cereals (such as oat) and ancient grains in the diets of celiac patients, this review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed on those cereals for which the toxicity for celiac subjects is still controversial. According to in vivo studies, selected oat varieties could be tolerated by celiac patients. On the other hands, although some wheat-ancient grains (Triticum monococcum, Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta and Kamut(R)) showed a reduced in vitro toxicity, to date, these grains are still considered toxic for celiac patients. Contradictory results underline the importance of studying the safety of "unusual" cereals in more detail.

Ancient and Modern Cereals as Ingredients of the Gluten-Free Diet: Are They Safe Enough for Celiac Consumers? / F. Colombo, C.M. Di Lorenzo, S. Biella, C. Bani, P.A. Restani. - In: FOODS. - ISSN 2304-8158. - 10:4(2021 Apr 20), pp. 906.1-906.20. [10.3390/foods10040906]

Ancient and Modern Cereals as Ingredients of the Gluten-Free Diet: Are They Safe Enough for Celiac Consumers?

F. Colombo
Primo
;
C.M. Di Lorenzo
Secondo
;
S. Biella;C. Bani;P.A. Restani
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals after consuming prolamins from some cereals. Although the products available for celiac subjects have increased significantly in quality and quantity over the last few decades, research still focuses on identifying new ingredients to improve the nutritional, sensorial and functional qualities of gluten-free products. In terms of toxicity for people with celiac disease, there is a wide variability between ancient and modern grains. The most contradictory results are related to the role of oats in the gluten-free diet. In order to clarify the role of minor cereals (such as oat) and ancient grains in the diets of celiac patients, this review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed on those cereals for which the toxicity for celiac subjects is still controversial. According to in vivo studies, selected oat varieties could be tolerated by celiac patients. On the other hands, although some wheat-ancient grains (Triticum monococcum, Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta and Kamut(R)) showed a reduced in vitro toxicity, to date, these grains are still considered toxic for celiac patients. Contradictory results underline the importance of studying the safety of "unusual" cereals in more detail.
Avena sativa; Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta; Triticum monococcum; Triticum turgidum; celiac disease; gluten-free diet;
Settore CHIM/10 - Chimica degli Alimenti
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/844336
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