In animal livestock heavy metals are widely used as feed additives to control enteric bacterial infections as well as to enhance the integrity of the immune system. As these metals are only partially adsorbed by animals, the content of heavy metals in manure and wastewaters causes soil and ground water contamination, with Zn2+ and Cu2+ being the most critical output from pig livestock. Phytoremediation is considered a valid strategy to improve the purity of wastewaters. This work studied the effect of Zn2+ and Cu2+ on the morphology and protein expression in Thelypteris palustris and Typha latifolia plants, cultured in a wetland pilot system. Despite the absence of macroscopic alterations, remodeling of cell walls and changes in carbohydrate metabolism were observed in the rhizomes of both plants and in leaves of Thelypteris palustris. However, similar modifications seemed to be determined by the alterations of different mechanisms in these plants. These data also suggested that marsh ferns are more sensitive to metals than monocots. Whereas toleration mechanisms seemed to be activated in Typha latifolia, in Thelypteris palustris the observed modifications appeared as slight toxic effects due to metal exposure. This study clearly indicates that both plants could be successfully employed in in situ phytoremediation systems, to remove Cu2+ and Zn2+ at concentrations that are ten times higher than the legal limits, without affecting plant growth.

Typha latifolia and Thelypteris palustris behavior in a pilot system for the refinement of livestock wastewaters : A case of study / N. Stroppa, E. Onelli, M. Hejna, L. Rossi, A. Gagliardi, L. Bini, A. Baldi, A. Moscatelli. - In: CHEMOSPHERE. - ISSN 0045-6535. - 240(2020 Feb), pp. 124915.1-124915.14. [10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.124915]

Typha latifolia and Thelypteris palustris behavior in a pilot system for the refinement of livestock wastewaters : A case of study

Stroppa, Nadia;Onelli, Elisabetta;Hejna, Monika;Rossi, Luciana;Baldi, Antonella;Moscatelli, Alessandra
2020-02

Abstract

In animal livestock heavy metals are widely used as feed additives to control enteric bacterial infections as well as to enhance the integrity of the immune system. As these metals are only partially adsorbed by animals, the content of heavy metals in manure and wastewaters causes soil and ground water contamination, with Zn2+ and Cu2+ being the most critical output from pig livestock. Phytoremediation is considered a valid strategy to improve the purity of wastewaters. This work studied the effect of Zn2+ and Cu2+ on the morphology and protein expression in Thelypteris palustris and Typha latifolia plants, cultured in a wetland pilot system. Despite the absence of macroscopic alterations, remodeling of cell walls and changes in carbohydrate metabolism were observed in the rhizomes of both plants and in leaves of Thelypteris palustris. However, similar modifications seemed to be determined by the alterations of different mechanisms in these plants. These data also suggested that marsh ferns are more sensitive to metals than monocots. Whereas toleration mechanisms seemed to be activated in Typha latifolia, in Thelypteris palustris the observed modifications appeared as slight toxic effects due to metal exposure. This study clearly indicates that both plants could be successfully employed in in situ phytoremediation systems, to remove Cu2+ and Zn2+ at concentrations that are ten times higher than the legal limits, without affecting plant growth.
Typha latifolia; Thelypteris palustris; phytodepuration; livestock wastewaters; heavy metals
Settore BIO/01 - Botanica Generale
Settore AGR/18 - Nutrizione e Alimentazione Animale
18-set-2019
CHEMOSPHERE
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/678818
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