Carnosine (beta-alanyl-l-histidine) and its methylated analogue anserine are present in relevant concentrations in the omnivore human diet. Several studies reported promising therapeutic potential for carnosine in various rodent models of oxidative stress and inflammation-related chronic diseases. Nevertheless, the poor serum stability of carnosine in humans makes the translation of rodent models hard. Even though anserine and carnosine have similar biochemical properties, anserine has better serum stability. Despite this interesting profile, the research on anserine is scarce. The aim of this study was to explore the bioavailability and stability of synthesized anserine by (1) performing in vitro stability experiments in human plasma and molecular modelling studies and by (2) evaluating the plasma and urinary pharmacokinetic profile in healthy volunteers following different doses of anserine (4–10–20 mg/kg body weight). A bio-analytical method for measuring anserine levels was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Both plasma (CMAX: 0.54–1.10–3.12 µM) and urinary (CMAX: 0.09–0.41–0.72 mg/mg creatinine) anserine increased dose-dependently following ingestion of 4–10–20 anserine mg/kg BW, respectively. The inter-individual variation in plasma anserine was mainly explained by the activity (R2 = 0.75) and content (R2 = 0.77) of the enzyme serum carnosinase-1. Compared to carnosine, a lower interaction energy of anserine with carnosinase-1 was suggested by molecular modelling studies. Conversely, the two dipeptides seems to have similar interaction with the PEPT1 transporter. It can be concluded that nutritionally relevant doses of synthesized anserine are well-absorbed and that its degradation by serum carnosinase-1 is less pronounced compared to carnosine. This makes anserine a good candidate as a more stable carnosine-analogue to attenuate chronic diseases in humans.

Development and validation of a sensitive LC–MS/MS assay for the quantification of anserine in human plasma and urine and its application to pharmacokinetic study / I. Everaert, G. Baron, S. Barbaresi, E. Gilardoni, C. Coppa, M. Carini, G. Vistoli, T. Bex, J. Stautemas, L. Blancquaert, W. Derave, G. Aldini, L. Regazzoni. - In: AMINO ACIDS. - ISSN 0939-4451. - 51:1(2019 Jan 28), pp. 103-114. [10.1007/s00726-018-2663-y]

Development and validation of a sensitive LC–MS/MS assay for the quantification of anserine in human plasma and urine and its application to pharmacokinetic study

G. Baron
Co-primo
;
E. Gilardoni;C. Coppa;M. Carini;G. Vistoli;G. Aldini
Penultimo
;
L. Regazzoni
Ultimo
2019-01-28

Abstract

Carnosine (beta-alanyl-l-histidine) and its methylated analogue anserine are present in relevant concentrations in the omnivore human diet. Several studies reported promising therapeutic potential for carnosine in various rodent models of oxidative stress and inflammation-related chronic diseases. Nevertheless, the poor serum stability of carnosine in humans makes the translation of rodent models hard. Even though anserine and carnosine have similar biochemical properties, anserine has better serum stability. Despite this interesting profile, the research on anserine is scarce. The aim of this study was to explore the bioavailability and stability of synthesized anserine by (1) performing in vitro stability experiments in human plasma and molecular modelling studies and by (2) evaluating the plasma and urinary pharmacokinetic profile in healthy volunteers following different doses of anserine (4–10–20 mg/kg body weight). A bio-analytical method for measuring anserine levels was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Both plasma (CMAX: 0.54–1.10–3.12 µM) and urinary (CMAX: 0.09–0.41–0.72 mg/mg creatinine) anserine increased dose-dependently following ingestion of 4–10–20 anserine mg/kg BW, respectively. The inter-individual variation in plasma anserine was mainly explained by the activity (R2 = 0.75) and content (R2 = 0.77) of the enzyme serum carnosinase-1. Compared to carnosine, a lower interaction energy of anserine with carnosinase-1 was suggested by molecular modelling studies. Conversely, the two dipeptides seems to have similar interaction with the PEPT1 transporter. It can be concluded that nutritionally relevant doses of synthesized anserine are well-absorbed and that its degradation by serum carnosinase-1 is less pronounced compared to carnosine. This makes anserine a good candidate as a more stable carnosine-analogue to attenuate chronic diseases in humans.
Anserine; Carnosinase-1; Carnosine; Pharmacokinetics; Biochemistry; Clinical Biochemistry; Organic Chemistry
Settore CHIM/08 - Chimica Farmaceutica
9-ott-2018
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/599742
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