BackgroundDiogenes syndrome is a neurobehavioural syndrome characterised by domestic squalor, hoarding and lack of insight. It is an uncommon but high-mortality condition, often associated with dementia.AimsTo describe the clinical features and treatment of Diogenes syndrome secondary to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD).MethodWe describe a case of bvFTD in a 77-year-old man presenting with Diogenes syndrome.ResultsThe patient's medical and psychiatric histories were unremarkable, but in recent years he had begun packing his flat with 'art pieces'. Mental state examination revealed confabulation and more structured delusions. Neuropsychological evaluation outlined an impairment in selective attention and letter verbal fluency, but no semantic impairment, in the context of an overall preserved mental functioning. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose showed mild bilateral temporo-insular atrophy and hypometabolism in the left-superior temporal gyrus respectively. An amyloid PET scan and genetic analysis covering the dementia spectrum were normal. A diagnosis of bvFTD was made.ConclusionsThe clinical framing of behavioural symptoms of dementia such as hoarding poses a diagnostic challenge. This case illustrates the importance of a deeper understanding of Diogenes syndrome, leading to timelier diagnosis and effective therapeutic strategies.

Diogenes syndrome in dementia: a case report / L. Sacchi, E. Rotondo, S. Pozzoli, A. Fiorentini, G. Schinco, C. Mandelli, C. Coppola, G.G. Fumagalli, T. Carandini, A.M. Pietroboni, D. Galimberti, F. Triulzi, G. Marotta, E. Scarpini, M. Cesari, P. Brambilla, A. Arighi. - In: BJPSYCH OPEN. - ISSN 2056-4724. - 7:2(2021 Mar), pp. e43.1-e43.5. [10.1192/bjo.2020.171]

Diogenes syndrome in dementia: a case report

E. Rotondo
Secondo
;
S. Pozzoli;A. Fiorentini;G. Schinco;C. Mandelli;G.G. Fumagalli;T. Carandini;A.M. Pietroboni;D. Galimberti;F. Triulzi;E. Scarpini;M. Cesari;P. Brambilla
Penultimo
;
A. Arighi
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

BackgroundDiogenes syndrome is a neurobehavioural syndrome characterised by domestic squalor, hoarding and lack of insight. It is an uncommon but high-mortality condition, often associated with dementia.AimsTo describe the clinical features and treatment of Diogenes syndrome secondary to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD).MethodWe describe a case of bvFTD in a 77-year-old man presenting with Diogenes syndrome.ResultsThe patient's medical and psychiatric histories were unremarkable, but in recent years he had begun packing his flat with 'art pieces'. Mental state examination revealed confabulation and more structured delusions. Neuropsychological evaluation outlined an impairment in selective attention and letter verbal fluency, but no semantic impairment, in the context of an overall preserved mental functioning. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose showed mild bilateral temporo-insular atrophy and hypometabolism in the left-superior temporal gyrus respectively. An amyloid PET scan and genetic analysis covering the dementia spectrum were normal. A diagnosis of bvFTD was made.ConclusionsThe clinical framing of behavioural symptoms of dementia such as hoarding poses a diagnostic challenge. This case illustrates the importance of a deeper understanding of Diogenes syndrome, leading to timelier diagnosis and effective therapeutic strategies.
Diogenes syndrome; collecting; frontotemporal dementia; hoarding;
Settore MED/37 - Neuroradiologia
2-feb-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/821988
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