A life-long dietary intervention can affect the substrates' availability for gut fermentation in metabolic diseases such as the glycogen-storage diseases (GSD). Besides drug consumption, the main treatment of types GSD-Ia and Ib to prevent metabolic complications is a specific diet with definite nutrient intakes. In order to evaluate how deeply this dietary treatment affects gut bacteria, we compared the gut microbiota of nine GSD-I subjects and 12 healthy controls (HC) through 16S rRNA gene sequencing; we assessed their dietary intake and nutrients, their microbial short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) via gas chromatography and their hematic values. Both alpha-diversity and phylogenetic analysis revealed a significant biodiversity reduction in the GSD group compared to the HC group, and highlighted profound differences of their gut microbiota. GSD subjects were characterized by an increase in the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Veillonellaceae families, while the beneficial genera Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira were significantly reduced. SCFA quantification revealed a significant increase of fecal acetate and propionate in GSD subjects, but with a beneficial role probably reduced due to unbalanced bacterial interactions; nutritional values correlated to bacterial genera were significantly different between experimental groups, with nearly opposite cohort trends.

Proteobacteria Overgrowth and Butyrate-Producing Taxa Depletion in the Gut Microbiota of Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1 Patients / C. Ceccarani, G. Bassanini, C. Montanari, M.C. Casiraghi, E. Ottaviano, G. Morace, G. Biasucci, S. Paci, E. Borghi, E. Verduci. - In: METABOLITES. - ISSN 2218-1989. - 10:4(2020 Apr), pp. 133.1-133.17. [10.3390/metabo10040133]

Proteobacteria Overgrowth and Butyrate-Producing Taxa Depletion in the Gut Microbiota of Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1 Patients

C. Ceccarani
Co-primo
;
G. Bassanini
Co-primo
;
C. Montanari;M.C. Casiraghi;E. Ottaviano;G. Morace;E. Borghi
;
E. Verduci
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

A life-long dietary intervention can affect the substrates' availability for gut fermentation in metabolic diseases such as the glycogen-storage diseases (GSD). Besides drug consumption, the main treatment of types GSD-Ia and Ib to prevent metabolic complications is a specific diet with definite nutrient intakes. In order to evaluate how deeply this dietary treatment affects gut bacteria, we compared the gut microbiota of nine GSD-I subjects and 12 healthy controls (HC) through 16S rRNA gene sequencing; we assessed their dietary intake and nutrients, their microbial short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) via gas chromatography and their hematic values. Both alpha-diversity and phylogenetic analysis revealed a significant biodiversity reduction in the GSD group compared to the HC group, and highlighted profound differences of their gut microbiota. GSD subjects were characterized by an increase in the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Veillonellaceae families, while the beneficial genera Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira were significantly reduced. SCFA quantification revealed a significant increase of fecal acetate and propionate in GSD subjects, but with a beneficial role probably reduced due to unbalanced bacterial interactions; nutritional values correlated to bacterial genera were significantly different between experimental groups, with nearly opposite cohort trends.
GSD; diet; glycogen storage disease; gut microbiota; inflammation; short-chain fatty acids
Settore MED/07 - Microbiologia e Microbiologia Clinica
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
apr-2020
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/728083
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