Aim of this work was to study the relationship between goat milk quality and milking management practices. The study was conducted on 148 dairy goat farms in Lombardy (Italy), with particular focus on milk somatic cell count (SCC) and milk fat/protein reversion syndrome. Direct interviews to the farmers were collected. Monthly bulk milk analyses in 1 year (fat, protein, casein and lactose percentages, somatic cell and standard plate count) were used for quality evaluation of goat milk. Individual milk production was on average 1.26 ± 0.44 kg/d, collected during 1.94 ± 0.18 milkings a day. Average number of dairy goats was 74.3 ± 95.8; most of farms reared Alpine goats (38%), 36.5% Saanen, 16.3% Alpine and Saanen, and 9.2% local breeds. Milk quality was quite good (3.52 ± 0.73% fat, 3.40 ± 0.46% protein, 2.62 ± 0.40% casein). Milking was performed on bedded area in 13.8% of farms, inside the barn in 53.6% and in a separate milking room in 32.6%. A multiple correspondence analysis was performed and high correlations were found (the first two dimensions explained 31.5% of variance) among farms characterized by local breeds, small size (<45 dairy goats), no official milk recording, milking on bedded area, no udder cleaning before milking, no forestripping, no teat post-dipping and no use of gloves by milkers. High correlation was found among farms with Saanen and Alpine goats, large size (>70 dairy goats), presence of official milk recording, milking inside the barn (but out of bedded area) or in a separate room, udder cleaning before milking, forestripping, teat post-dipping and use of gloves by milkers. A second multiple correspondence analysis was performed and high correlations were found among farms characterized by local breeds, low milk fat (<3.5%) and low protein content (<3.4%), milk for cheese processed by farmers, low content of SCC and standard count plate, probably due to a special care at milking for farm cheese making. On the other hand, high correlation was found among farms with Saanen and Alpine goats, large farm size (>70 dairy goats), high milk fat content, no milk fat/protein reversion syndrome and milk delivered to dairies, probably due to a special care in ration formulation and attention to milk quality. The study demonstrates the importance of milking and farming strategies to improve goat milk quality.

Milk quality and milking practices in dairy goat farms in Lombardy / M. Zucali, A. Tamburini, G. Gislon, A. Sandrucci, L. Bava. - In: ITALIAN JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. - ISSN 1594-4077. - 16:suppl.1(2017 Jun 13), pp. 91-92. ((Intervento presentato al 22. convegno ASPA tenutosi a Perugia nel 2017.

Milk quality and milking practices in dairy goat farms in Lombardy

M. Zucali
Primo
;
A. Tamburini
Secondo
;
G. Gislon;A. Sandrucci
Penultimo
;
L. Bava
2017

Abstract

Aim of this work was to study the relationship between goat milk quality and milking management practices. The study was conducted on 148 dairy goat farms in Lombardy (Italy), with particular focus on milk somatic cell count (SCC) and milk fat/protein reversion syndrome. Direct interviews to the farmers were collected. Monthly bulk milk analyses in 1 year (fat, protein, casein and lactose percentages, somatic cell and standard plate count) were used for quality evaluation of goat milk. Individual milk production was on average 1.26 ± 0.44 kg/d, collected during 1.94 ± 0.18 milkings a day. Average number of dairy goats was 74.3 ± 95.8; most of farms reared Alpine goats (38%), 36.5% Saanen, 16.3% Alpine and Saanen, and 9.2% local breeds. Milk quality was quite good (3.52 ± 0.73% fat, 3.40 ± 0.46% protein, 2.62 ± 0.40% casein). Milking was performed on bedded area in 13.8% of farms, inside the barn in 53.6% and in a separate milking room in 32.6%. A multiple correspondence analysis was performed and high correlations were found (the first two dimensions explained 31.5% of variance) among farms characterized by local breeds, small size (<45 dairy goats), no official milk recording, milking on bedded area, no udder cleaning before milking, no forestripping, no teat post-dipping and no use of gloves by milkers. High correlation was found among farms with Saanen and Alpine goats, large size (>70 dairy goats), presence of official milk recording, milking inside the barn (but out of bedded area) or in a separate room, udder cleaning before milking, forestripping, teat post-dipping and use of gloves by milkers. A second multiple correspondence analysis was performed and high correlations were found among farms characterized by local breeds, low milk fat (<3.5%) and low protein content (<3.4%), milk for cheese processed by farmers, low content of SCC and standard count plate, probably due to a special care at milking for farm cheese making. On the other hand, high correlation was found among farms with Saanen and Alpine goats, large farm size (>70 dairy goats), high milk fat content, no milk fat/protein reversion syndrome and milk delivered to dairies, probably due to a special care in ration formulation and attention to milk quality. The study demonstrates the importance of milking and farming strategies to improve goat milk quality.
Settore AGR/19 - Zootecnica Speciale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/509001
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