In the last few years, several attempts have been made to treat large bone loss, including the use of tissue engineering with osteoinductive scaffolds and cells. This study highlights the role of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ASCs; adipose-derived stem cells) in a rabbit bone regeneration model. We compared the neoformed bone tissues achieved by treating critical tibial defects with either hydroxyapatite alone (HA, group I) or hydroxyapatite-autologous ASC constructs (ASCs-HA, group II), investigating their histomorphometric, immunohistochemical and biomechanical properties. After eight weeks of follow-up, we observed advanced maturation and a spatial distribution of new bone that was more homogeneous in the inner parts of the pores in group II, not just along the walls (as seen in group I). The new tissue expressed osteogenic markers, and biomechanical tests suggested that the newly formed bone in group II had a higher mineral content than that in group I. Although variability in differentiation was observed among the different cell populations in vitro, no differences in bone healing were observed in vivo; the variability seen in vitro was probably due to local microenvironment effects. Tibial defects treated with rabbit ASCs-HA showed an improved healing process when compared to the process that occurred when only the scaffold was used. We suggest that implanted ASCs ameliorate the bone reparative process either directly or by recruiting resident progenitor cells.

Adipose-derived stem cells and rabbit bone regeneration : histomorphometric, immunohistochemical and mechanical characterizations / E. Arrigoni, L. de Girolamo, A. Di Giancamillo, D. Stanco, C. Dellavia, D. Carnelli, M. Campagnol, C. Domeneghini, A.T. Brini. - In: JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC SCIENCE. - ISSN 0949-2658. - 18:2(2013 Mar), pp. 331-339. [10.1007/s00776-012-0349-y]

Adipose-derived stem cells and rabbit bone regeneration : histomorphometric, immunohistochemical and mechanical characterizations

E. Arrigoni
Primo
;
L. de Girolamo
Secondo
;
A. Di Giancamillo;C. Dellavia;M. Campagnol;C. Domeneghini;A.T. Brini
2013-03

Abstract

In the last few years, several attempts have been made to treat large bone loss, including the use of tissue engineering with osteoinductive scaffolds and cells. This study highlights the role of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ASCs; adipose-derived stem cells) in a rabbit bone regeneration model. We compared the neoformed bone tissues achieved by treating critical tibial defects with either hydroxyapatite alone (HA, group I) or hydroxyapatite-autologous ASC constructs (ASCs-HA, group II), investigating their histomorphometric, immunohistochemical and biomechanical properties. After eight weeks of follow-up, we observed advanced maturation and a spatial distribution of new bone that was more homogeneous in the inner parts of the pores in group II, not just along the walls (as seen in group I). The new tissue expressed osteogenic markers, and biomechanical tests suggested that the newly formed bone in group II had a higher mineral content than that in group I. Although variability in differentiation was observed among the different cell populations in vitro, no differences in bone healing were observed in vivo; the variability seen in vitro was probably due to local microenvironment effects. Tibial defects treated with rabbit ASCs-HA showed an improved healing process when compared to the process that occurred when only the scaffold was used. We suggest that implanted ASCs ameliorate the bone reparative process either directly or by recruiting resident progenitor cells.
critical-size defects; scaffold interaction; nanoindentation; differentiation; grafs; repair; sheep
Settore BIO/16 - Anatomia Umana
Settore BIO/17 - Istologia
Settore MED/33 - Malattie Apparato Locomotore
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
Settore BIO/13 - Biologia Applicata
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/219462
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