In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum wild-type and derivative mutant strains was investigated. Bacterial survival was evaluated in an in vitro system, simulating the transit along the human oro-gastro-intestinal tract. Interaction with human gut epithelial cells was studied by assessing bacterial adhesive ability to Caco-2 cells and induction of genes involved in innate immunity. L. plantarum strains were resistant to the combined stress at the various steps of the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Major decreases in the viability of L. plantarum cells were observed mainly under drastic acidic conditions (pH≤2.0) of the gastric compartment. Abiotic stresses associated to small intestine poorly affected bacterial viability. All the bacterial strains significantly adhered to Caco-2 cells, with the ?ctsR mutant strain exhibiting the highest adhesion. Induction of immunerelated genes resulted higher upon incubation with heatinactivated bacteria rather than with live ones. For specific genes, a differential transcriptional pattern was observed upon stimulation with different L. plantarum strains, evidencing a possible role of the knocked out bacterial genes in the modulation of host cell response. In particular, cells from Δhsp18.55 and ΔftsH mutants strongly triggered immune defence genes. Our study highlights the relevance of microbial genetic background in host-probiotic interaction and might contribute to identify candidate bacterial genes and molecules involved in probiosis.

Probiotic features of Lactobacillus plantarum mutant strains / P. Bove, A. Gallone, P. Russo, V. Capozzi, M. Albenzio, G. Spano, D. Fiocco. - In: APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. - ISSN 0175-7598. - 96:2(2012 Oct), pp. 431-441. [10.1007/s00253-012-4031-2]

Probiotic features of Lactobacillus plantarum mutant strains

P. Russo;
2012

Abstract

In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum wild-type and derivative mutant strains was investigated. Bacterial survival was evaluated in an in vitro system, simulating the transit along the human oro-gastro-intestinal tract. Interaction with human gut epithelial cells was studied by assessing bacterial adhesive ability to Caco-2 cells and induction of genes involved in innate immunity. L. plantarum strains were resistant to the combined stress at the various steps of the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Major decreases in the viability of L. plantarum cells were observed mainly under drastic acidic conditions (pH≤2.0) of the gastric compartment. Abiotic stresses associated to small intestine poorly affected bacterial viability. All the bacterial strains significantly adhered to Caco-2 cells, with the ?ctsR mutant strain exhibiting the highest adhesion. Induction of immunerelated genes resulted higher upon incubation with heatinactivated bacteria rather than with live ones. For specific genes, a differential transcriptional pattern was observed upon stimulation with different L. plantarum strains, evidencing a possible role of the knocked out bacterial genes in the modulation of host cell response. In particular, cells from Δhsp18.55 and ΔftsH mutants strongly triggered immune defence genes. Our study highlights the relevance of microbial genetic background in host-probiotic interaction and might contribute to identify candidate bacterial genes and molecules involved in probiosis.
bacterial adhesion; immune modulation; Lactobacillus plantarum mutants; probiotic; mucosal barrier
Settore AGR/16 - Microbiologia Agraria
ott-2012
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/952190
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