Background Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is a rare metabolic encephalopathy. Familial forms are poorly investigated, and no previous studies have explored aspects of Glut1-DS over the course of life: clinical pictures, intelligence, life achievements, and quality of life in adulthood. Clinical, biochemical and genetic data in a cohort of familial Glut1-DS cases were collected from medical records. Intelligence was assessed using Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices in adults and children, respectively. An ad hoc interview focusing on life achievements and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire were administered to adult subjects. Results The clinical picture in adults was characterized by paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia (PED) (80%), fatigue (60%), low intelligence (60%), epilepsy (50%), and migraine (50%). However, 20% of the adults had higher-than-average intelligence. Quality of Life (QoL) seemed unrelated to the presence of PED or fatigue in adulthood. An association of potential clinical relevance, albeit not statistically significant, was found between intelligence and QoL. The phenotype of familial Glut1-DS in children was characterized by epilepsy (83.3%), intellectual disability (50%), and PED (33%). Conclusion The phenotype of familial Glut1-DS shows age-related differences: epilepsy predominates in childhood; PED and fatigue, followed by epilepsy and migraine, characterize the condition in adulthood. Some adults with familial Glut1-DS may lead regular and fulfilling lives, enjoying the same QoL as unaffected individuals. The disorder tends to worsen from generation to generation, with new and more severe symptoms arising within the same family. Epigenetic studies might be useful to assess the phenotypic variability in Glut1-DS.

Glut1 deficiency syndrome throughout life: clinical phenotypes, intelligence, life achievements and quality of life in familial cases / S. Olivotto, A. Duse, S. Maria Bova, V. Leonardi, E. Biganzoli, A. Milanese, C. Cereda, S. Bertoli, R. Previtali, P. Veggiotti. - In: ORPHANET JOURNAL OF RARE DISEASES. - ISSN 1750-1172. - 17:1(2022 Sep 24), pp. 365.1-365.13. [10.1186/s13023-022-02513-4]

Glut1 deficiency syndrome throughout life: clinical phenotypes, intelligence, life achievements and quality of life in familial cases

A. Duse;E. Biganzoli;A. Milanese;S. Bertoli;R. Previtali
Penultimo
;
P. Veggiotti
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Background Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is a rare metabolic encephalopathy. Familial forms are poorly investigated, and no previous studies have explored aspects of Glut1-DS over the course of life: clinical pictures, intelligence, life achievements, and quality of life in adulthood. Clinical, biochemical and genetic data in a cohort of familial Glut1-DS cases were collected from medical records. Intelligence was assessed using Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices in adults and children, respectively. An ad hoc interview focusing on life achievements and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire were administered to adult subjects. Results The clinical picture in adults was characterized by paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia (PED) (80%), fatigue (60%), low intelligence (60%), epilepsy (50%), and migraine (50%). However, 20% of the adults had higher-than-average intelligence. Quality of Life (QoL) seemed unrelated to the presence of PED or fatigue in adulthood. An association of potential clinical relevance, albeit not statistically significant, was found between intelligence and QoL. The phenotype of familial Glut1-DS in children was characterized by epilepsy (83.3%), intellectual disability (50%), and PED (33%). Conclusion The phenotype of familial Glut1-DS shows age-related differences: epilepsy predominates in childhood; PED and fatigue, followed by epilepsy and migraine, characterize the condition in adulthood. Some adults with familial Glut1-DS may lead regular and fulfilling lives, enjoying the same QoL as unaffected individuals. The disorder tends to worsen from generation to generation, with new and more severe symptoms arising within the same family. Epigenetic studies might be useful to assess the phenotypic variability in Glut1-DS.
Familial GLUT1-DS; Glut1 deficiency syndrome; IQ; Life achievement; Quality of life;
Settore MED/39 - Neuropsichiatria Infantile
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/938825
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