Macrophages can promote tumorigenesis and enhance the antitumour response. This Review discusses the molecular mechanisms underlying the reprogramming of macrophages in the tumour microenvironment and provides an overview of macrophage-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.Tumour-associated macrophages are an essential component of the tumour microenvironment and have a role in the orchestration of angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodelling, cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and immunosuppression, as well as in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Conversely, when appropriately activated, macrophages can mediate phagocytosis of cancer cells and cytotoxic tumour killing, and engage in effective bidirectional interactions with components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Therefore, they have emerged as therapeutic targets in cancer therapy. Macrophage-targeting strategies include inhibitors of cytokines and chemokines involved in the recruitment and polarization of tumour-promoting myeloid cells as well as activators of their antitumorigenic and immunostimulating functions. Early clinical trials suggest that targeting negative regulators (checkpoints) of myeloid cell function indeed has antitumor potential. Finally, given the continuous recruitment of myelomonocytic cells into tumour tissues, macrophages are candidates for cell therapy with the development of chimeric antigen receptor effector cells. Macrophage-centred therapeutic strategies have the potential to complement, and synergize with, currently available tools in the oncology armamentarium.

Macrophages as tools and targets in cancer therapy / A. Mantovani, P. Allavena, F. Marchesi, C. Garlanda. - In: NATURE REVIEWS DRUG DISCOVERY. - ISSN 1474-1776. - (2022 Aug 16), pp. 1-22. [10.1038/s41573-022-00520-5]

Macrophages as tools and targets in cancer therapy

A. Mantovani
;
F. Marchesi;
2022

Abstract

Macrophages can promote tumorigenesis and enhance the antitumour response. This Review discusses the molecular mechanisms underlying the reprogramming of macrophages in the tumour microenvironment and provides an overview of macrophage-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.Tumour-associated macrophages are an essential component of the tumour microenvironment and have a role in the orchestration of angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodelling, cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and immunosuppression, as well as in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Conversely, when appropriately activated, macrophages can mediate phagocytosis of cancer cells and cytotoxic tumour killing, and engage in effective bidirectional interactions with components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Therefore, they have emerged as therapeutic targets in cancer therapy. Macrophage-targeting strategies include inhibitors of cytokines and chemokines involved in the recruitment and polarization of tumour-promoting myeloid cells as well as activators of their antitumorigenic and immunostimulating functions. Early clinical trials suggest that targeting negative regulators (checkpoints) of myeloid cell function indeed has antitumor potential. Finally, given the continuous recruitment of myelomonocytic cells into tumour tissues, macrophages are candidates for cell therapy with the development of chimeric antigen receptor effector cells. Macrophage-centred therapeutic strategies have the potential to complement, and synergize with, currently available tools in the oncology armamentarium.
Settore MED/04 - Patologia Generale
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41573-022-00520-5
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/936790
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