Bacterial populations inhabiting a variety of natural and human-associated niches have the ability to grow in the form of biofilms. A large part of pathological chronic conditions, and essentially all the bacterial infections associated with implanted medical devices or prosthetics, are caused by microorganisms embedded in a matrix made of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. Biofilm infections are generally characterized by a slow onset, mild symptoms, tendency to chronicity, and refractory response to antibiotic therapy. Even though the molecular mechanisms responsible for resistance to antimicrobial agents and host defenses have been deeply clarified, effective means to fight biofilms are still required. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), used as probiotics, are emerging as powerful weapons to prevent adhesion, biofilm formation, and control overgrowth of pathogens. Hence, using probiotics or their metabolites to quench and interrupt bacterial communication and aggregation, and to interfere with biofilm formation and stability, might represent a new frontier in clinical microbiology and a valid alternative to antibiotic therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the experimental and therapeutic applications of LAB to interfere with biofilm formation or disrupt the stability of pathogenic biofilms.

Probiotics as Therapeutic Tools against Pathogenic Biofilms: Have We Found the Perfect Weapon? / G. Meroni, S. Panelli, G.V. Zuccotti, C. Bandi, L. Drago, D. Pistone. - In: MICROBIOLOGY RESEARCH. - ISSN 2036-7481. - 12:4(2021 Dec 06), pp. 916-937. [10.3390/microbiolres12040068]

Probiotics as Therapeutic Tools against Pathogenic Biofilms: Have We Found the Perfect Weapon?

G. Meroni
Primo
;
S. Panelli
Secondo
;
G.V. Zuccotti;C. Bandi;L. Drago
Penultimo
;
D. Pistone
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Bacterial populations inhabiting a variety of natural and human-associated niches have the ability to grow in the form of biofilms. A large part of pathological chronic conditions, and essentially all the bacterial infections associated with implanted medical devices or prosthetics, are caused by microorganisms embedded in a matrix made of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. Biofilm infections are generally characterized by a slow onset, mild symptoms, tendency to chronicity, and refractory response to antibiotic therapy. Even though the molecular mechanisms responsible for resistance to antimicrobial agents and host defenses have been deeply clarified, effective means to fight biofilms are still required. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), used as probiotics, are emerging as powerful weapons to prevent adhesion, biofilm formation, and control overgrowth of pathogens. Hence, using probiotics or their metabolites to quench and interrupt bacterial communication and aggregation, and to interfere with biofilm formation and stability, might represent a new frontier in clinical microbiology and a valid alternative to antibiotic therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the experimental and therapeutic applications of LAB to interfere with biofilm formation or disrupt the stability of pathogenic biofilms.
No
English
lactic acid bacteria; biofilms; probiotics; quorum sensing; antibiotic resistance;
Settore MED/07 - Microbiologia e Microbiologia Clinica
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Pubblicazione scientifica
6-dic-2021
MDPI
12
4
916
937
22
Pubblicato
Periodico con rilevanza internazionale
orcid
crossref
wos
Aderisco
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Probiotics as Therapeutic Tools against Pathogenic Biofilms: Have We Found the Perfect Weapon? / G. Meroni, S. Panelli, G.V. Zuccotti, C. Bandi, L. Drago, D. Pistone. - In: MICROBIOLOGY RESEARCH. - ISSN 2036-7481. - 12:4(2021 Dec 06), pp. 916-937. [10.3390/microbiolres12040068]
open
Prodotti della ricerca::01 - Articolo su periodico
6
262
Article (author)
Periodico senza Impact Factor
G. Meroni, S. Panelli, G.V. Zuccotti, C. Bandi, L. Drago, D. Pistone
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/922836
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