In the last decades, antimicrobial resistance increased exponentially, so valuable alternatives are urgently needed. Functional feed additives contain bioactive compounds that can improve the animals’ health status and immune defence. In this scenario, tributyrin possesses antibacterial activity, promotes both gut health maintenance and nutrient absorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tributyrin supplementation in young animals’ diet on animal growth and health status. Firstly, 120 piglets were weaned at 28±2d and divided into two experimental groups fed for 40 days an isoenergetic and isoproteic diet differentiable only for the inclusion of 0.2% of tributyrin (CTRL and TRIB group). Individual body weight and feed intake were recorded weekly. Faecal and blood samples were collected for the evaluation of principal metabolic parameters and the gut microbiota analysis. Secondly, at birth, 12 calves were randomly allotted in two experimental groups differentiable for the inclusion of 0.3% of liquid tributyrin in milk replacer (CTRL and TRIB group). The trial lasted 42 days. Individual body weight, feed intake, faecal score (0–3; considering diarrhoea ≥2) were recorded to assess performance and diarrhoea incidence. Faecal samples were collected weekly for the evaluation of principal microbial families. Piglets in the TRIB group revealed improved zootechnical performance (p < .05) and a higher level of serum insulin and high-density lipoprotein was observed (p < .05). Gut microbiota revealed a decrease in Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. simultaneously with an increased β diversity (p < .05). In calves, TRIB group highlighted no differences in zootechnical parameters, while a statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea incidence was observed (p < .05) during the whole experimental period in TRIB compared to CTRL group. Calves from TRIB group revealed a decreased incidence of moderate diarrhoea (faecal score =2; p < .01) without observing a significant difference in the principal bacterial families. In conclusion, the supplementation of tributyrin in young animals could promote zootechnical performance and health status suggesting tributyrin as promising feed additive as alternative to antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals. Acknowledgements The research study was done in the frame of FOODTECH PROJECT (ID 203370, this project is co-funded by Lombardy Region and European Regional Development Fund).

Tributyrin as feed supplement for young animals / M. Dell'Anno, V. Caprarulo, S. Reggi, M. Luisa Callegari, M. Hejna, L. Rossi - In: ASPA 24th Congress Book of Abstract[s.l] : Italian Journal of Animal Science, 2021 Sep 21. - pp. 143-144 (( Intervento presentato al 24. convegno Congress of the Animal Science and Production Association tenutosi a Padova nel 2021.

Tributyrin as feed supplement for young animals

M. Dell'Anno
Primo
;
V. Caprarulo
Secondo
;
S. Reggi;M. Hejna
Penultimo
;
L. Rossi
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

In the last decades, antimicrobial resistance increased exponentially, so valuable alternatives are urgently needed. Functional feed additives contain bioactive compounds that can improve the animals’ health status and immune defence. In this scenario, tributyrin possesses antibacterial activity, promotes both gut health maintenance and nutrient absorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tributyrin supplementation in young animals’ diet on animal growth and health status. Firstly, 120 piglets were weaned at 28±2d and divided into two experimental groups fed for 40 days an isoenergetic and isoproteic diet differentiable only for the inclusion of 0.2% of tributyrin (CTRL and TRIB group). Individual body weight and feed intake were recorded weekly. Faecal and blood samples were collected for the evaluation of principal metabolic parameters and the gut microbiota analysis. Secondly, at birth, 12 calves were randomly allotted in two experimental groups differentiable for the inclusion of 0.3% of liquid tributyrin in milk replacer (CTRL and TRIB group). The trial lasted 42 days. Individual body weight, feed intake, faecal score (0–3; considering diarrhoea ≥2) were recorded to assess performance and diarrhoea incidence. Faecal samples were collected weekly for the evaluation of principal microbial families. Piglets in the TRIB group revealed improved zootechnical performance (p < .05) and a higher level of serum insulin and high-density lipoprotein was observed (p < .05). Gut microbiota revealed a decrease in Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. simultaneously with an increased β diversity (p < .05). In calves, TRIB group highlighted no differences in zootechnical parameters, while a statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea incidence was observed (p < .05) during the whole experimental period in TRIB compared to CTRL group. Calves from TRIB group revealed a decreased incidence of moderate diarrhoea (faecal score =2; p < .01) without observing a significant difference in the principal bacterial families. In conclusion, the supplementation of tributyrin in young animals could promote zootechnical performance and health status suggesting tributyrin as promising feed additive as alternative to antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals. Acknowledgements The research study was done in the frame of FOODTECH PROJECT (ID 203370, this project is co-funded by Lombardy Region and European Regional Development Fund).
Settore AGR/18 - Nutrizione e Alimentazione Animale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/909739
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