Purpose The use of allografts in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is increasing although they are still supposed to be associated to greater risk of re-rupture due to a slower and less efficient graft maturation. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to compare the graft maturation after ACLR with allograft and autograft by MRI at 6- and 12-month follow-up and integrate these data with the functional and clinical results observed at 6-, 12- and 60-month follow-up. Methods Fifty patients with indication to primary ACLR were randomly and equally divided into hamstring autograft or allograft tendon groups. The graft maturation was measured at 6- and 12-month follow-up by the SNQ score and other radiological parameters on MRI scans. Clinical and functional recovery was evaluated by Lysholm score, Visual Analogues Scale, Tegner activity scale and modified Cincinnati knee rating system at 6, 12 and 60 months after surgery to estimate the predictive value of the radiological parameters for clinical outcomes. Return-to-sport (ACL-RSI) was measured 60 months after surgery. Results Three patients had retear of the neo-ligament (two from Auto group and one from Allo group). All the clinical/functional parameters significantly improved over time, with no statistically significant difference between the groups. At 6 months, the SNQ value was significantly higher in the Auto than in the Allo group (12.9 vs 7.9, p = 0.038), but at 12 months they were comparable (9.8 vs 10.4). The 6-month SNQ values did not correlate with the clinical scores, whereas the 12-month SNQ values significantly correlated with the Cincinnati score, Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale collected at 60-month follow-up. Conclusion No clinical or functional differences have been found between the two treatment groups, supporting the suitability of using allograft in primary ACLR, when available. The results at MRI scans showed a different graft maturation trend in the two groups, with allografts being more reactive in the first 6 months. MRI together with the subjective evaluation allows to evaluate objectively the status of the neo-ligamentization process and therefore helps the surgeon to dictate the individual time for return-to-sport.

Different timing in allograft and autograft maturation after primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not influence the clinical outcome at mid-long-term follow-up / A. Cusumano, P. Capitani, C. Messina, L. de Girolamo, M. Viganò, G. Ravasio, F. Facchini, L.M. Sconfienza, A. Zerbi, H. Schoenhuber, R. Pozzoni, G. Thiébat. - In: KNEE SURGERY, SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY, ARTHROSCOPY. - ISSN 0942-2056. - (2021). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1007/s00167-021-06785-4]

Different timing in allograft and autograft maturation after primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not influence the clinical outcome at mid-long-term follow-up

A. Cusumano
Primo
;
P. Capitani
Secondo
;
C. Messina;L. de Girolamo;G. Ravasio;F. Facchini;L.M. Sconfienza;G. Thiébat
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Purpose The use of allografts in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is increasing although they are still supposed to be associated to greater risk of re-rupture due to a slower and less efficient graft maturation. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to compare the graft maturation after ACLR with allograft and autograft by MRI at 6- and 12-month follow-up and integrate these data with the functional and clinical results observed at 6-, 12- and 60-month follow-up. Methods Fifty patients with indication to primary ACLR were randomly and equally divided into hamstring autograft or allograft tendon groups. The graft maturation was measured at 6- and 12-month follow-up by the SNQ score and other radiological parameters on MRI scans. Clinical and functional recovery was evaluated by Lysholm score, Visual Analogues Scale, Tegner activity scale and modified Cincinnati knee rating system at 6, 12 and 60 months after surgery to estimate the predictive value of the radiological parameters for clinical outcomes. Return-to-sport (ACL-RSI) was measured 60 months after surgery. Results Three patients had retear of the neo-ligament (two from Auto group and one from Allo group). All the clinical/functional parameters significantly improved over time, with no statistically significant difference between the groups. At 6 months, the SNQ value was significantly higher in the Auto than in the Allo group (12.9 vs 7.9, p = 0.038), but at 12 months they were comparable (9.8 vs 10.4). The 6-month SNQ values did not correlate with the clinical scores, whereas the 12-month SNQ values significantly correlated with the Cincinnati score, Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale collected at 60-month follow-up. Conclusion No clinical or functional differences have been found between the two treatment groups, supporting the suitability of using allograft in primary ACLR, when available. The results at MRI scans showed a different graft maturation trend in the two groups, with allografts being more reactive in the first 6 months. MRI together with the subjective evaluation allows to evaluate objectively the status of the neo-ligamentization process and therefore helps the surgeon to dictate the individual time for return-to-sport.
ACL; Allograft; Anterior cruciate ligament; Autograft; Graft Maturation; MRI; Reconstruction; SNQ
Settore MED/33 - Malattie Apparato Locomotore
Settore MED/36 - Diagnostica per Immagini e Radioterapia
16-nov-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/883704
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