Context: Growth of male genitalia represents an important marker of sexual development. Testicle size is the primary measure and little is known regards penile length changes during puberty. Objective: This work aims to assess penis growth and testosterone levels in obese vs normal-weight children and adolescents, to evaluate a possible influence of obesity on genital development in boys, and to establish a new method for measuring penis length that allows comparison of normal-weight and overweight boys. Methods: We assessed anthropometric and genital development in 1130 boys from birth to age 20 years. Testosterone levels were also measured. A new method for penile length measurement was employed to minimize errors when comparing obese and nonobese children. Penis length was measured with a gentle, painless, straight positioning on a centimetric ruler without stretching, which is doable from the first years of life until the end of adolescence. Results: Penis length and testosterone are strongly related in children during puberty. Penile length growth is significantly decreased (by about 10%) in obese boys when compared to normal-weight boys, with concomitantly reduced testosterone levels, across puberal phases. Conclusion: Childhood obesity represents an important determinant of lower testosterone level and reduced penis development. A new method should be employed to improve penis measurement in normal-weight and overweight/obese boys. The possible significance of these observations for adult genital development and reproductive potential will require large longitudinal studies.

Obesity is strongly associated with low testosterone and reduced penis growth during development / M. Mancini, F. Pecori Giraldi, A. Andreassi, G. Mantellassi, M. Salvioni, C.C. Berra, R. Manfrini, G. Banderali, F. Folli. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. - ISSN 0021-972X. - (2021), pp. 1-9. [Epub ahead of print] [10.1210/clinem/dgab535]

Obesity is strongly associated with low testosterone and reduced penis growth during development

F. Pecori Giraldi
Data Curation
;
M. Salvioni;F. Folli
Writing – Review & Editing
2021

Abstract

Context: Growth of male genitalia represents an important marker of sexual development. Testicle size is the primary measure and little is known regards penile length changes during puberty. Objective: This work aims to assess penis growth and testosterone levels in obese vs normal-weight children and adolescents, to evaluate a possible influence of obesity on genital development in boys, and to establish a new method for measuring penis length that allows comparison of normal-weight and overweight boys. Methods: We assessed anthropometric and genital development in 1130 boys from birth to age 20 years. Testosterone levels were also measured. A new method for penile length measurement was employed to minimize errors when comparing obese and nonobese children. Penis length was measured with a gentle, painless, straight positioning on a centimetric ruler without stretching, which is doable from the first years of life until the end of adolescence. Results: Penis length and testosterone are strongly related in children during puberty. Penile length growth is significantly decreased (by about 10%) in obese boys when compared to normal-weight boys, with concomitantly reduced testosterone levels, across puberal phases. Conclusion: Childhood obesity represents an important determinant of lower testosterone level and reduced penis development. A new method should be employed to improve penis measurement in normal-weight and overweight/obese boys. The possible significance of these observations for adult genital development and reproductive potential will require large longitudinal studies.
Children; Growth; Measurements; Obesity; Penis; Testosterone
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
20-lug-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/868326
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