Aerobic pre-treatment was applied prior to two-stage anaerobic digestion process. Three different food wastes samples, namely carbohydrate rich, protein rich and lipid rich, were prepared as substrates. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production was studied. Pre-aeration of substrates showed no positive impact on hydrogen production in the first stage. All three categories of pre-aerated food wastes produced less hydrogen compared to samples without pre-aeration. In the second stage, methane production increased for aerated protein rich and carbohydrate rich samples. In addition, the lag phase for carbohydrate rich substrate was shorter for aerated samples. Aerated protein rich substrate yielded the best results among substrates for methane production, with a cumulative production of approximately 351 ml/gVS. With regard to non-aerated substrates, lipid rich was the best substrate for CH4 production (263 ml/gVS). Pre-aerated P substrate was the best in terms of total energy generation which amounted to 9.64 kJ/gVS. This study revealed aerobic pre-treatment to be a promising option for use in achieving enhanced substrate conversion efficiencies and CH4 production in a two-stage AD process, particularly when the substrate contains high amounts of proteins.

Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process using food waste with different compositions / R. Rafieenia, F. Girotto, W. Peng, R. Cossu, A. Pivato, R. Raga, M.C. Lavagnolo. - In: WASTE MANAGEMENT. - ISSN 0956-053X. - 59(2017), pp. 194-199. [10.1016/j.wasman.2016.10.028]

Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process using food waste with different compositions

F. Girotto;
2017

Abstract

Aerobic pre-treatment was applied prior to two-stage anaerobic digestion process. Three different food wastes samples, namely carbohydrate rich, protein rich and lipid rich, were prepared as substrates. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production was studied. Pre-aeration of substrates showed no positive impact on hydrogen production in the first stage. All three categories of pre-aerated food wastes produced less hydrogen compared to samples without pre-aeration. In the second stage, methane production increased for aerated protein rich and carbohydrate rich samples. In addition, the lag phase for carbohydrate rich substrate was shorter for aerated samples. Aerated protein rich substrate yielded the best results among substrates for methane production, with a cumulative production of approximately 351 ml/gVS. With regard to non-aerated substrates, lipid rich was the best substrate for CH4 production (263 ml/gVS). Pre-aerated P substrate was the best in terms of total energy generation which amounted to 9.64 kJ/gVS. This study revealed aerobic pre-treatment to be a promising option for use in achieving enhanced substrate conversion efficiencies and CH4 production in a two-stage AD process, particularly when the substrate contains high amounts of proteins.
Aerobic pre-treatment; Anaerobic digestion; Food waste; Hydrogen; Methane; Anaerobiosis; Bioreactors; Carbohydrates; Fatty Acids, Volatile; Food; Food Industry; Hydrogen; Hydrolysis; Lipids; Methane; Refuse Disposal; Sewage; Biodegradation, Environmental; Industrial Waste
Settore ICAR/03 - Ingegneria Sanitaria-Ambientale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/864839
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