Background: Although many studies have considered mortality and adverse effects as outcomes sensitive to nursing practice, it seems that other outcomes of nursing care in intensive care units have been explored less commonly. Objectives: To describe the state-of-science in research in the field of nursing sensitive outcomes in intensive care units and to synthesize outcomes that have been documented to date as being influenced by nursing care. Design: A scoping review study based on the framework proposed by Arksey and O'Malley, further refined by the Levac and Joanna Briggs Institute was performed in 2019. Data sources: The Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar electronic databases were searched. In addition, the reference list of included articles was screened. Review methods: Two researchers independently identified publications on the basis of the following criteria: (a) articles that reported nursing sensitive outcomes on critically-ill adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit, (b) as primary and secondary studies, (c) written in English, and (d) without any time frame limitation. Results: Of the 4,231 records, 112 fully met the inclusion criteria and were included. Publications were mainly authored in the US and Canada (n = 44, 39.2%), and the majority (n = 62, 55.3%) had an observational design. A total of 233 nursing sensitive outcomes emerged, categorized in 35 outcomes, with, on average, two per study included. The most often measured outcomes were pressure ulcers (20 studies) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (19 studies); the less studied outcomes were quality of life, secretion clearance, patient-ventilator dysynchrony, and post-extubation dysphagia. When categorizing outcomes, the ones concerning safety (n = 77, 33.1%) were represented the most, followed by those concerning the clinical (n = 72, 30.9%), functional (n = 70, 30.0%), and perceptual (n = 14, 6.0%) domains. The interdependent outcomes linked to multi-professional interventions (e.g., ventilator-associated pneumonias) were the most frequently studied nursing sensitive outcomes (n = 20, 57.1%), while independent outcomes resulting from autonomous interventions performed by nurses were less often studied (n = 8, 22.9%). Conclusions: From a clinical point of view, a large heterogeneity of outcomes influenced by nursing care emerged. However, identified outcomes have been studied with different approaches and metrics, so that future efforts will need to establish homogeneous conceptual and operative definitions. Moreover, increasing efforts in establishing perceptual outcomes, or those close to the fundamentals of nursing care, are suggested in order to better depict the contribution of critical care nurses in the field.

What nursing sensitive outcomes have been studied to-date among patients cared for in intensive care units? Findings from a scoping review / M. Danielis, A. Palese, S. Terzoni, A.L.L. Destrebecq. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES. - ISSN 0020-7489. - 102(2020 Feb), pp. 103491.1-103491.16. [10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.103491]

What nursing sensitive outcomes have been studied to-date among patients cared for in intensive care units? Findings from a scoping review

Danielis M.;Terzoni S.;Destrebecq A. L. L.
2020-02

Abstract

Background: Although many studies have considered mortality and adverse effects as outcomes sensitive to nursing practice, it seems that other outcomes of nursing care in intensive care units have been explored less commonly. Objectives: To describe the state-of-science in research in the field of nursing sensitive outcomes in intensive care units and to synthesize outcomes that have been documented to date as being influenced by nursing care. Design: A scoping review study based on the framework proposed by Arksey and O'Malley, further refined by the Levac and Joanna Briggs Institute was performed in 2019. Data sources: The Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar electronic databases were searched. In addition, the reference list of included articles was screened. Review methods: Two researchers independently identified publications on the basis of the following criteria: (a) articles that reported nursing sensitive outcomes on critically-ill adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit, (b) as primary and secondary studies, (c) written in English, and (d) without any time frame limitation. Results: Of the 4,231 records, 112 fully met the inclusion criteria and were included. Publications were mainly authored in the US and Canada (n = 44, 39.2%), and the majority (n = 62, 55.3%) had an observational design. A total of 233 nursing sensitive outcomes emerged, categorized in 35 outcomes, with, on average, two per study included. The most often measured outcomes were pressure ulcers (20 studies) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (19 studies); the less studied outcomes were quality of life, secretion clearance, patient-ventilator dysynchrony, and post-extubation dysphagia. When categorizing outcomes, the ones concerning safety (n = 77, 33.1%) were represented the most, followed by those concerning the clinical (n = 72, 30.9%), functional (n = 70, 30.0%), and perceptual (n = 14, 6.0%) domains. The interdependent outcomes linked to multi-professional interventions (e.g., ventilator-associated pneumonias) were the most frequently studied nursing sensitive outcomes (n = 20, 57.1%), while independent outcomes resulting from autonomous interventions performed by nurses were less often studied (n = 8, 22.9%). Conclusions: From a clinical point of view, a large heterogeneity of outcomes influenced by nursing care emerged. However, identified outcomes have been studied with different approaches and metrics, so that future efforts will need to establish homogeneous conceptual and operative definitions. Moreover, increasing efforts in establishing perceptual outcomes, or those close to the fundamentals of nursing care, are suggested in order to better depict the contribution of critical care nurses in the field.
Critically ill patient; Intensive care unit; Nursing sensitive outcome; Quality of care; Scoping review
Settore MED/45 - Scienze Infermieristiche Generali, Cliniche e Pediatriche
28-nov-2019
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/702082
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