Low bone mass is a frequent finding in HIV-infected individuals. Reduced bone mass has been found in vertically infected children who are receiving antiretroviral treatment. Little is known about bone mass in horizontally infected young patients who are naive to antiretroviral therapy. We measured the bone mineral content (BMC) at the lumbar spine and in the whole skeleton by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 16 HIV-infected children (age 9.3 +/- 3.9 years) naive to antiretroviral treatment, and in 119 healthy children (age 9.7 +/- 3.3 years). Thirteen patients were also pair-matched by anthropometric measures, sex, and age with healthy children. Median spine BMC of HIV-infected children was 14.9 g (8.2-39.2 g), and whole body BMC was 1106.1 g (55.5-2344.1 g). Spine BMC of healthy children was 18.6 g (6.8-52.2 g), and whole body BMC was 1213.5 g (541.0-2722.0 g). Multivariate analysis showed a mean difference of spine BMC values of 0.004 g (P = 0.64) between the two groups. Similarly, the whole body BMC difference between the two groups (0.001 g) was not statistically significant (P = 0.55). Mean spine BMC measurements in the case-control evaluation were 21.1 g (9.7 g) (patients), and 22.3 g (6.9 g) (controls). Whole body BMC measurements of patients and controls were 1258.5 g (539.6 g) and 1311.1 g (479.2 g), respectively. In both cases the differences were not significant. The duration of HIV infection did not relate to BMC values. In conclusion, horizontally HIV-infected children naive to antiretroviral therapy have bone mineral measurements comparable to those of healthy children.

Analysis of bone mineral content in horizontally HIV-infected children naive to antiretroviral treatment / S. Mora, I. Zamproni, V. Giacomet, L. Cafarelli, C. Figini, A. Viganò. - In: CALCIFIED TISSUE INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0171-967X. - 76:5(2005), pp. 336-340.

Analysis of bone mineral content in horizontally HIV-infected children naive to antiretroviral treatment

V. Giacomet;
2005

Abstract

Low bone mass is a frequent finding in HIV-infected individuals. Reduced bone mass has been found in vertically infected children who are receiving antiretroviral treatment. Little is known about bone mass in horizontally infected young patients who are naive to antiretroviral therapy. We measured the bone mineral content (BMC) at the lumbar spine and in the whole skeleton by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 16 HIV-infected children (age 9.3 +/- 3.9 years) naive to antiretroviral treatment, and in 119 healthy children (age 9.7 +/- 3.3 years). Thirteen patients were also pair-matched by anthropometric measures, sex, and age with healthy children. Median spine BMC of HIV-infected children was 14.9 g (8.2-39.2 g), and whole body BMC was 1106.1 g (55.5-2344.1 g). Spine BMC of healthy children was 18.6 g (6.8-52.2 g), and whole body BMC was 1213.5 g (541.0-2722.0 g). Multivariate analysis showed a mean difference of spine BMC values of 0.004 g (P = 0.64) between the two groups. Similarly, the whole body BMC difference between the two groups (0.001 g) was not statistically significant (P = 0.55). Mean spine BMC measurements in the case-control evaluation were 21.1 g (9.7 g) (patients), and 22.3 g (6.9 g) (controls). Whole body BMC measurements of patients and controls were 1258.5 g (539.6 g) and 1311.1 g (479.2 g), respectively. In both cases the differences were not significant. The duration of HIV infection did not relate to BMC values. In conclusion, horizontally HIV-infected children naive to antiretroviral therapy have bone mineral measurements comparable to those of healthy children.
bone mass; bone mineral content; children; HIV-infection
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Calcif Tissue Int 2005-336.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 107.64 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
107.64 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/670965
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 12
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact