Aims: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and progression to dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-eight MCI subjects (mean age 74.04 ± 6.94 years; 57% female) from a memory clinic were followed for 2.40 ± 1.58 years. Baseline height and weight were used to calculate the BMI. The main outcome was progression to dementia (DSM-IV criteria) and AD (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the longitudinal association of BMI with dementia and AD, adjusting for a comprehensive set of covariates, including vascular risk factors/diseases and neuroimaging profiles. Results: Out of 228 subjects with MCI, 117 (51.3%) progressed to dementia. Eighty-nine (76%) of the incident dementia cases had AD. In both unadjusted and multi-adjusted models, a higher BMI was associated with a reduced risk of dementia (multi-adjusted HR 0.9; 95% CI 0.8-0.9) and AD (multi-adjusted HR 0.9; 95% CI 0.8-0.9). Being underweight increased the risk of all types of dementia (multi-adjusted HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.1) but was not specifically associated with AD (multi-adjusted HR 2.2; 95% CI 0.9-5.3). Conclusions: BMI predicted progression of MCI to dementia and AD. In particular, a higher BMI was associated with a lower risk of dementia and AD, and underweight was associated with a higher risk of dementia. BMI assessment may improve the prognostic accuracy of MCI in clinical practice.

Body mass index predicts progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia / I. Cova, F. Clerici, L. Maggiore, S. Pomati, V. Cucumo, R. Ghiretti, D. Galimberti, E. Scarpini, C. Mariani, B. Caracciolo. - In: DEMENTIA AND GERIATRIC COGNITIVE DISORDERS. - ISSN 1420-8008. - 41:3-4(2016 May), pp. 172-180. [10.1159/000444216]

Body mass index predicts progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia

I. Cova
;
L. Maggiore;S. Pomati;V. Cucumo;R. Ghiretti;D. Galimberti;E. Scarpini;C. Mariani
Penultimo
;
2016-05

Abstract

Aims: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and progression to dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-eight MCI subjects (mean age 74.04 ± 6.94 years; 57% female) from a memory clinic were followed for 2.40 ± 1.58 years. Baseline height and weight were used to calculate the BMI. The main outcome was progression to dementia (DSM-IV criteria) and AD (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the longitudinal association of BMI with dementia and AD, adjusting for a comprehensive set of covariates, including vascular risk factors/diseases and neuroimaging profiles. Results: Out of 228 subjects with MCI, 117 (51.3%) progressed to dementia. Eighty-nine (76%) of the incident dementia cases had AD. In both unadjusted and multi-adjusted models, a higher BMI was associated with a reduced risk of dementia (multi-adjusted HR 0.9; 95% CI 0.8-0.9) and AD (multi-adjusted HR 0.9; 95% CI 0.8-0.9). Being underweight increased the risk of all types of dementia (multi-adjusted HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.1) but was not specifically associated with AD (multi-adjusted HR 2.2; 95% CI 0.9-5.3). Conclusions: BMI predicted progression of MCI to dementia and AD. In particular, a higher BMI was associated with a lower risk of dementia and AD, and underweight was associated with a higher risk of dementia. BMI assessment may improve the prognostic accuracy of MCI in clinical practice.
Alzheimer's disease; body mass index; dementia; mild cognitive impairment; weight loss; geriatrics and gerontology; cognitive neuroscience; psychiatry and mental health
Settore MED/26 - Neurologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/502793
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