One of the key objectives of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 75 was to shed light on the underlying causesof Cretaceous oceanic anoxia in the South Atlantic by addressing two major hypotheses: productivity productivity-driven anoxia vs. enhanced ocean stratification leading to preservation of organic matter and black shale deposition. Here we present a detailed geochemical dataset from sediments deposited during the Cenomanian/Turonian (C/T) transition and the global oceanic anoxic event 2 (OAE 2) at DSDP Site 530A, located off-shore Namibia (southeast Angola Basin, north ofWalvis Ridge). To characterise the succession of alternating black and green shales at this site and to reconstruct the evolution of their paleoenvironmental setting, wehave combined data derived from investigations on bulk organic matter, biomarkers and the inorganic fraction. The location of the C/T boundary itself is biostratigraphically not well constrained due to the carbonate-poor (but organic matter-rich) facies of these sediments. The bulk δ13Corg record and compound-specific δ13C data, in combination with published as well as new biostratigraphic data, enabled us to locate more precisely the C/T boundary at DSDP Site 530A. The compound-specific δ13C record is the first of this kind reported from C/T black shales in the South Atlantic. It is employed for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and chemostratigraphic correlation to other C/T sections in order to discuss the paleoceanographic aspects and implications of the observations at DSDP Site 530A in a broader context, e.g., with regard to the potential trigger mechanisms of OAE 2, global changes in black shale deposition and climate. On a stratigraphic level, an approximation and monitoring of the syndepositional degree of oxygen depletion within the sediments/bottom waters in comparison to the upperwater column is achieved by comparing normalised concentrations of redox-sensitive trace elements with the abundance of highly source specific molecular compounds. These biomarkers are derived from photoautotrophic and simultaneously anoxygenic green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiacea) and are interpreted as paleoindicators for events of photic zone euxinia. In contrast to a number of other OAE 2 sections that are characterised by continuous black shale sequences, DSDP Site 530A represents a highly dynamic setting where newly deposited black shales were repeatedly exposed to conditions of subtle bottomwater reoxidation, presumably leading to their progressive alteration into green shales. The frequent alternation between both facies and the related anoxic to slight oxygenated conditions can be best explained by variations in vertical extent of an oxygen minimum zone in response to changes in a highly productive western continental margin setting driven by upwelling.

The Cenomanian/Turonian oceanic anoxic event in the South Atlantic : new insights by a geochemical study of DSDP Leg 75 Site 530A / A. Forster, M.M.M. Kuypers, S. C. Turgeon, H-J. Brumsack, M.R. Petrizzo, J.S. Sinninghe Damsté. - In: PALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY. - ISSN 0031-0182. - 267:3-4(2008), pp. 256-283.

The Cenomanian/Turonian oceanic anoxic event in the South Atlantic : new insights by a geochemical study of DSDP Leg 75 Site 530A

M.R. Petrizzo
Penultimo
;
2008

Abstract

One of the key objectives of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 75 was to shed light on the underlying causesof Cretaceous oceanic anoxia in the South Atlantic by addressing two major hypotheses: productivity productivity-driven anoxia vs. enhanced ocean stratification leading to preservation of organic matter and black shale deposition. Here we present a detailed geochemical dataset from sediments deposited during the Cenomanian/Turonian (C/T) transition and the global oceanic anoxic event 2 (OAE 2) at DSDP Site 530A, located off-shore Namibia (southeast Angola Basin, north ofWalvis Ridge). To characterise the succession of alternating black and green shales at this site and to reconstruct the evolution of their paleoenvironmental setting, wehave combined data derived from investigations on bulk organic matter, biomarkers and the inorganic fraction. The location of the C/T boundary itself is biostratigraphically not well constrained due to the carbonate-poor (but organic matter-rich) facies of these sediments. The bulk δ13Corg record and compound-specific δ13C data, in combination with published as well as new biostratigraphic data, enabled us to locate more precisely the C/T boundary at DSDP Site 530A. The compound-specific δ13C record is the first of this kind reported from C/T black shales in the South Atlantic. It is employed for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and chemostratigraphic correlation to other C/T sections in order to discuss the paleoceanographic aspects and implications of the observations at DSDP Site 530A in a broader context, e.g., with regard to the potential trigger mechanisms of OAE 2, global changes in black shale deposition and climate. On a stratigraphic level, an approximation and monitoring of the syndepositional degree of oxygen depletion within the sediments/bottom waters in comparison to the upperwater column is achieved by comparing normalised concentrations of redox-sensitive trace elements with the abundance of highly source specific molecular compounds. These biomarkers are derived from photoautotrophic and simultaneously anoxygenic green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiacea) and are interpreted as paleoindicators for events of photic zone euxinia. In contrast to a number of other OAE 2 sections that are characterised by continuous black shale sequences, DSDP Site 530A represents a highly dynamic setting where newly deposited black shales were repeatedly exposed to conditions of subtle bottomwater reoxidation, presumably leading to their progressive alteration into green shales. The frequent alternation between both facies and the related anoxic to slight oxygenated conditions can be best explained by variations in vertical extent of an oxygen minimum zone in response to changes in a highly productive western continental margin setting driven by upwelling.
Angola Basin; Black shales; Cenomanian/Turonian boundary; Cretaceous; Oceanic anoxic event; Phytane; South Atlantic; Stable carbon isotopes
Settore GEO/01 - Paleontologia e Paleoecologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/48401
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