Introduction: It is important for HIV positive patients to be engaged in their care and be adherent to treatment in order to reduce disease progression and mortality. Studies found that illness representations influence adherence through the mediating role of coping behaviors. However, no study has ever tested if patient engagement to the visits mediate the relationship between illness perceptions and adherence. This study aimed to explore illness representations of HIV positive patients and test the hypothesis that illness representations predict adherence through the mediating role of a component of behavioral engagement. Methods: HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least one year and presenting to a check-up visit were eligible to participate in the study. Patients completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Behavioral engagement was measured based on the patients’ clinical attendance to the check-up visits; adherence to HAART was measured by viral load. Undetectable viral load or HIV-RNA < 40 copies/ml were considered indexes of virologic success. Results: A total of 161 patients participated in the study. Most of them coherently attributed the experienced symptoms to HIV/HAART; perceived their condition as chronic, stable, coherent, judged the therapy as effective, and attributed their disease to the HIV virus and to their behavior or bad luck. The majority of patients (80.1%) regularly attended check-up visits and 88.5% of them reached virologic success. The mediation model did not show good fit indexes. However, a significant direct effect of two independent variables on virologic success was found. Specifically, the perception that the disease does not have serious consequences on patient’s life and the prevalence of negative emotions toward HIV were associated with virologic success. On the contrary, the patient’s perception that the disease has serious consequences on his/her life and the prevalence of positive emotions were associated with virologic failure. This model showed good fit indexes (CFI = 1; TLI = 1; RMSEA = 0.00; and WRMSR = 0.309). Discussion: Results do not support the mediating role of behavioral engagement in the relationship between illness representations and adherence. As perception of serious consequences coupled with positive emotions are directly associated with virologic failure, clinicians should take them into account to promote treatment adherence.

Illness Representations of HIV Positive Patients Are Associated with Virologic Success / D. Leone, L. Borghi, G. Lamiani, L. Barlascini, T. Bini, A. d’Arminio Monforte, E. Vegni. - In: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-1078. - 7(2016 Dec 23), pp. 1997.1-1997.10.

Illness Representations of HIV Positive Patients Are Associated with Virologic Success

D. Leone
Primo
;
L. Borghi
;
G. Lamiani;A. d’Arminio Monforte
Penultimo
;
E. Vegni
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

Introduction: It is important for HIV positive patients to be engaged in their care and be adherent to treatment in order to reduce disease progression and mortality. Studies found that illness representations influence adherence through the mediating role of coping behaviors. However, no study has ever tested if patient engagement to the visits mediate the relationship between illness perceptions and adherence. This study aimed to explore illness representations of HIV positive patients and test the hypothesis that illness representations predict adherence through the mediating role of a component of behavioral engagement. Methods: HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least one year and presenting to a check-up visit were eligible to participate in the study. Patients completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Behavioral engagement was measured based on the patients’ clinical attendance to the check-up visits; adherence to HAART was measured by viral load. Undetectable viral load or HIV-RNA < 40 copies/ml were considered indexes of virologic success. Results: A total of 161 patients participated in the study. Most of them coherently attributed the experienced symptoms to HIV/HAART; perceived their condition as chronic, stable, coherent, judged the therapy as effective, and attributed their disease to the HIV virus and to their behavior or bad luck. The majority of patients (80.1%) regularly attended check-up visits and 88.5% of them reached virologic success. The mediation model did not show good fit indexes. However, a significant direct effect of two independent variables on virologic success was found. Specifically, the perception that the disease does not have serious consequences on patient’s life and the prevalence of negative emotions toward HIV were associated with virologic success. On the contrary, the patient’s perception that the disease has serious consequences on his/her life and the prevalence of positive emotions were associated with virologic failure. This model showed good fit indexes (CFI = 1; TLI = 1; RMSEA = 0.00; and WRMSR = 0.309). Discussion: Results do not support the mediating role of behavioral engagement in the relationship between illness representations and adherence. As perception of serious consequences coupled with positive emotions are directly associated with virologic failure, clinicians should take them into account to promote treatment adherence.
adherence; HAART; HIV; illness representations; IPQ-R; patient engagement; virologic success
Settore M-PSI/08 - Psicologia Clinica
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/465716
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