In oral delivery, lag phases of programmable duration that precede drug release may be advantageous in a number of instances, e.g. to meet chronotherapeutic needs or pursue colonic delivery. Systems that give rise to characteristic lag phases in their release profiles, i.e. intended for time-controlled release, are generally composed of a drug-containing core and a functional polymeric barrier. According to the nature of the polymer, the latter may delay the onset of drug release by acting as a rupturable, permeable or erodible boundary layer. Erodible systems are mostly based on water swellable polymers, such as hydrophilic cellulose ethers, and the release of the incorporated drug is deferred through the progressive hydration and erosion of the polymeric barrier upon contact with aqueous fluids. The extent of delay depends on the employed polymer, particularly on its viscosity grade, and on the thickness of the layer applied. The manufacturing technique may also have an impact on the performance of such systems. Double-compression and spray-coating have mainly been used, resulting in differing technical issues and release outcomes. In this article, an update on delivery systems based on erodible polymer barriers (coatings, shells) for time-controlled release is presented.

Erodible drug delivery systems for time-controlled release into the gastrointestinal tract / A. Maroni, L. Zema, M. Cerea, A. Foppoli, L. Palugan, A. Gazzaniga. - In: JOURNAL OF DRUG DELIVERY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. - ISSN 1773-2247. - 32:Part B(2016 Apr), pp. 229-235.

Erodible drug delivery systems for time-controlled release into the gastrointestinal tract

A. Maroni
Primo
;
L. Zema
Secondo
;
M. Cerea;A. Foppoli;L. Palugan
Penultimo
;
A. Gazzaniga
2016-04

Abstract

In oral delivery, lag phases of programmable duration that precede drug release may be advantageous in a number of instances, e.g. to meet chronotherapeutic needs or pursue colonic delivery. Systems that give rise to characteristic lag phases in their release profiles, i.e. intended for time-controlled release, are generally composed of a drug-containing core and a functional polymeric barrier. According to the nature of the polymer, the latter may delay the onset of drug release by acting as a rupturable, permeable or erodible boundary layer. Erodible systems are mostly based on water swellable polymers, such as hydrophilic cellulose ethers, and the release of the incorporated drug is deferred through the progressive hydration and erosion of the polymeric barrier upon contact with aqueous fluids. The extent of delay depends on the employed polymer, particularly on its viscosity grade, and on the thickness of the layer applied. The manufacturing technique may also have an impact on the performance of such systems. Double-compression and spray-coating have mainly been used, resulting in differing technical issues and release outcomes. In this article, an update on delivery systems based on erodible polymer barriers (coatings, shells) for time-controlled release is presented.
oral pulsatile release; oral colon delivery; coating; swellable/erodible hydrophilic polymers; Injection-molding; fused deposition modeling
Settore CHIM/09 - Farmaceutico Tecnologico Applicativo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/425444
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