Introduction: Jugular oxygen saturation monitoring was introduced in neurointensive care after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to explore the adequacy of brain perfusion and guide therapeutic interventions. The brain was considered homogeneous, and oxygen saturation was taken as representative of the whole organ. We investigated whether venous outflow from the brain was homogeneous by measuring oxygen saturation simultaneously from the two jugular veins.Methods: In 32 comatose TBI patients both internal jugular veins (IJs) were simultaneously explored using intermittent samples; hemoglobin saturation was also recorded continuously by fiber-optic catheters in five patients. In five cases long catheters were inserted bilaterally upstream, up to the sigmoid sinuses.Main findings: On average, measurements from the two sides were in agreement (mean and standard deviation of the differences between the saturation of the two IJs were respectively 5.32 and 5.15). However, 15 patients showed differences of more than 15 % in hemoglobin saturation at some point; three others showed differences larger than 10 %. No relationship was found between the computed tomographic scan data and the hemoglobin saturation pattern.Discussion/conclusion: Several groups have confirmed differences between oxygen saturation in the two jugular veins. After years of enthusiasm, interest for jugular saturation has decreased and more modern methods, such as tissue oxygenation monitoring, are now available. Jugular saturation monitoring has low sensitivity, with the risk of missing low saturation, but high specificity; moreover it is cheap, when used with intermittent sampling. Monitoring the adequacy of brain perfusion after severe TBI is essential. However the choice of a specific monitor depends on local resources and expertise.

My paper 20 years later : cerebral venous oxygen saturation studied with bilateral samples in the internal jugular veins / N. Stocchetti, S. Magnoni, E.R. Zanier. - In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE. - ISSN 0342-4642. - 41:3(2015), pp. 412-417.

My paper 20 years later : cerebral venous oxygen saturation studied with bilateral samples in the internal jugular veins

N. Stocchetti
Primo
;
S. Magnoni
Secondo
;
2015

Abstract

Introduction: Jugular oxygen saturation monitoring was introduced in neurointensive care after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to explore the adequacy of brain perfusion and guide therapeutic interventions. The brain was considered homogeneous, and oxygen saturation was taken as representative of the whole organ. We investigated whether venous outflow from the brain was homogeneous by measuring oxygen saturation simultaneously from the two jugular veins.Methods: In 32 comatose TBI patients both internal jugular veins (IJs) were simultaneously explored using intermittent samples; hemoglobin saturation was also recorded continuously by fiber-optic catheters in five patients. In five cases long catheters were inserted bilaterally upstream, up to the sigmoid sinuses.Main findings: On average, measurements from the two sides were in agreement (mean and standard deviation of the differences between the saturation of the two IJs were respectively 5.32 and 5.15). However, 15 patients showed differences of more than 15 % in hemoglobin saturation at some point; three others showed differences larger than 10 %. No relationship was found between the computed tomographic scan data and the hemoglobin saturation pattern.Discussion/conclusion: Several groups have confirmed differences between oxygen saturation in the two jugular veins. After years of enthusiasm, interest for jugular saturation has decreased and more modern methods, such as tissue oxygenation monitoring, are now available. Jugular saturation monitoring has low sensitivity, with the risk of missing low saturation, but high specificity; moreover it is cheap, when used with intermittent sampling. Monitoring the adequacy of brain perfusion after severe TBI is essential. However the choice of a specific monitor depends on local resources and expertise.
Cerebral blood flow; Jugular oxygen saturation; Traumatic brain injury; Adult; Brain; Brain Concussion; Brain Injuries; Carbon Dioxide; Cerebrovascular Circulation; Dominance, Cerebral; Female; Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial; Hematoma, Subdural; Hemoglobinometry; Humans; Intracranial Pressure; Jugular Veins; Male; Middle Aged; Oxygen; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Blood Specimen Collection; Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine; Medicine (all)
Settore MED/41 - Anestesiologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/422463
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