Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seventransmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee.

International union of pharmacology : LXXXIX : update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors [Recensione] / F. Bachelerie, A. Ben-Baruch, A.M. Burkhardt, C. Combadiere, J.M. Farber, G.J. Graham, R. Horuk, A.H. Sparre-Ulrich, M. Locati, A.D. Luster, A. Mantovani, K. Matsushima, P.M. Murphy, R. Nibbs, H. Nomiyama, C.A. Power, A.E.I. Proudfoot, M.M. Rosenkilde, A. Rot, S. Sozzani, M. Thelen, O. Yoshie, A. Zlotnik. - In: PHARMACOLOGICAL REVIEWS. - ISSN 0031-6997. - 66:1(2014), pp. 1-79. [10.1124/pr.113.007724]

International union of pharmacology : LXXXIX : update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors

M. Locati;A. Mantovani;
2014

Abstract

Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seventransmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee.
Animals; Arthropod Proteins; Humans; Protozoan Proteins; Terminology as Topic; Ticks; Viral Proteins; Receptors, Chemokine; Pharmacology; Molecular Medicine; protein-coupled receptor; monocyte chemoattractan protein-1; regulatory T-cells; sarcoma-associated herpersvirus; macrophage-derived chemokine; experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; heigh-affinity binding; messenger-RNA expression; duffy antigen receptor; central-nervous-system
Settore MED/04 - Patologia Generale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/252126
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