Gender differences in the response to a meal have been reported, but whether they are related to metabolic, endocrine or eating physiology is unclear. Specifically, different study protocols involving either fi xed meals or ad libitum caloric intakes among genders may have confounded this issue. We compared among genders (12M/12F, age 22.2±1.2 yr, BMI 21.8±1.3 kg*m-2) the metabolic, hormonal and satiety responses to a mixed meal, carefully normalized to individual daily caloric intake (TDI). After overnight fast, subjects consumed a meal providing 40% of TDI in energy (60% carbohydrates, 25% lipids, 15% proteins). Blood was sampled at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for glycemia and circulating insulin, c-peptide and ghrelin, and Visual Analogue Scale assessment of hunger and satiety was performed every 30 min. There were no differences among females and males in glycemic profi le, AUC (2755,8 ± 607,2 vs. 2555,2 ± 637,0 mg*min/dl) and Δ peak, insulin profi le, AUC (10469,8 ± 2564,6 vs. 10542,0 ± 2913,9 μU/ml *min/dl) and Δpeak, identically to c-peptide, and in insulinogenic index (ΔInsulin(μU/ml)/ ΔGlucose (mg/dl): 0,19 ± 0,05 vs. 0,18 ± 0,03). Ghrelin was nearly halved in both genders within 1h and remained similarly suppressed thereafter. In contrast, hunger was maximally suppressed immediately at the consumption of the meal in 10/12 women and only 4/10 males (p<0.02), who also tendentially delayed the peak of satiety (p=0,08). In conclusion, when mixed meals are normalized to TDI, genders show similar metabolic, insulin and ghrelin responses but an earlier hunger reduction and satiety stimulation in women. Among genders, the differences in meal responses may be due to different eating physiology and energy requirements rather than to different metabolic handling of the meal.

Gender differences in the metabolic, endocrine, and eating physiological responses to a mixed meal / A. Battezzati, G. De Carlo, R. De Amicis, A. Pirovano, A. Leone, A. Spadafranca, S. Bertoli. - In: DIABETES. - ISSN 0012-1797. - 63:suppl 1(2014), pp. 62OR.16-62OR.17. ((Intervento presentato al 73. convegno Scientific Sessions of American Diabetes Association tenutosi a Chicago nel 2014.

Gender differences in the metabolic, endocrine, and eating physiological responses to a mixed meal

A. Battezzati
Primo
;
R. De Amicis;A. Pirovano;A. Leone;A. Spadafranca
Penultimo
;
S. Bertoli
Ultimo
2014

Abstract

Gender differences in the response to a meal have been reported, but whether they are related to metabolic, endocrine or eating physiology is unclear. Specifically, different study protocols involving either fi xed meals or ad libitum caloric intakes among genders may have confounded this issue. We compared among genders (12M/12F, age 22.2±1.2 yr, BMI 21.8±1.3 kg*m-2) the metabolic, hormonal and satiety responses to a mixed meal, carefully normalized to individual daily caloric intake (TDI). After overnight fast, subjects consumed a meal providing 40% of TDI in energy (60% carbohydrates, 25% lipids, 15% proteins). Blood was sampled at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for glycemia and circulating insulin, c-peptide and ghrelin, and Visual Analogue Scale assessment of hunger and satiety was performed every 30 min. There were no differences among females and males in glycemic profi le, AUC (2755,8 ± 607,2 vs. 2555,2 ± 637,0 mg*min/dl) and Δ peak, insulin profi le, AUC (10469,8 ± 2564,6 vs. 10542,0 ± 2913,9 μU/ml *min/dl) and Δpeak, identically to c-peptide, and in insulinogenic index (ΔInsulin(μU/ml)/ ΔGlucose (mg/dl): 0,19 ± 0,05 vs. 0,18 ± 0,03). Ghrelin was nearly halved in both genders within 1h and remained similarly suppressed thereafter. In contrast, hunger was maximally suppressed immediately at the consumption of the meal in 10/12 women and only 4/10 males (p<0.02), who also tendentially delayed the peak of satiety (p=0,08). In conclusion, when mixed meals are normalized to TDI, genders show similar metabolic, insulin and ghrelin responses but an earlier hunger reduction and satiety stimulation in women. Among genders, the differences in meal responses may be due to different eating physiology and energy requirements rather than to different metabolic handling of the meal.
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/63/Supplement_1/A1.full.pdf
Centro Internazionale per lo Studio della Composizione Corporea ICANS
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/251854
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