BACKGROUND: Bronchopleural fistula after lung resection still represents a challenging life-threatening complication for thoracic surgeons. Considering its extremely high mortality rate, an effective treatment is urgently required. Our project investigated the hypothesis of experimental bronchopleural fistula closure by bronchoscopic injection of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the cavity of the fistula, evaluating its feasibility and safety in a large animal model. METHODS: An experimental bronchopleural fistula was created in 9 goats after right upper tracheal lobectomy. The animals were randomly assigned to two groups: one received autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell bronchoscopic transplantation; the other received standard bronchoscopic fibrin glue injection. RESULTS: All animals receiving bronchoscopic stem cell transplantation presented fistula closure by extraluminal fibroblast proliferation and collagenous matrix development; none (0%) died during the study period. All animals receiving standard treatment still presented bronchopleural fistula; 2 of them (40%) died. Findings were confirmed by pathology examination, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchoscopic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells effectively closes experimental bronchopleural fistula by extraluminal fibroblast proliferation and collagenous matrix development. Stem cells may play a crucial role in the treatment of postresectional bronchopleural fistula after standard lung resection. Although these results provide a basis for the development of clinical therapeutic strategies, the exact mechanism by which they are obtained is not yet completely clear; further studies are required to understand exactly how stem cells work in this field.

Stem cell transplantation effectively occludes bronchopleural fistula in an animal model / F. Petrella, F. Toffalorio, S. Brizzola, T.M. De Pas, S. Rizzo, M. Barberis, P. Pelicci, L. Spaggiari, F. Acocella. - In: ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY. - ISSN 0003-4975. - 97:2(2014 Feb), pp. 480-483. [10.1016/j.athoracsur.2013.10.032]

Stem cell transplantation effectively occludes bronchopleural fistula in an animal model

F. Petrella;S. Brizzola;S. Rizzo;P. Pelicci;L. Spaggiari;F. Acocella
2014-02

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bronchopleural fistula after lung resection still represents a challenging life-threatening complication for thoracic surgeons. Considering its extremely high mortality rate, an effective treatment is urgently required. Our project investigated the hypothesis of experimental bronchopleural fistula closure by bronchoscopic injection of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the cavity of the fistula, evaluating its feasibility and safety in a large animal model. METHODS: An experimental bronchopleural fistula was created in 9 goats after right upper tracheal lobectomy. The animals were randomly assigned to two groups: one received autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell bronchoscopic transplantation; the other received standard bronchoscopic fibrin glue injection. RESULTS: All animals receiving bronchoscopic stem cell transplantation presented fistula closure by extraluminal fibroblast proliferation and collagenous matrix development; none (0%) died during the study period. All animals receiving standard treatment still presented bronchopleural fistula; 2 of them (40%) died. Findings were confirmed by pathology examination, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchoscopic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells effectively closes experimental bronchopleural fistula by extraluminal fibroblast proliferation and collagenous matrix development. Stem cells may play a crucial role in the treatment of postresectional bronchopleural fistula after standard lung resection. Although these results provide a basis for the development of clinical therapeutic strategies, the exact mechanism by which they are obtained is not yet completely clear; further studies are required to understand exactly how stem cells work in this field.
lung-cancer ; differentiation ; 15 ; CTSNet classification
Settore MED/04 - Patologia Generale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/237449
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