BACKGROUND: Nephrolithiasis is more frequent and severe in obese patients from different western nations. This may be supported by higher calcium, urate, oxalate excretion in obese stone formers. Except these parameters, clinical characteristics of obese stone formers were not extensively explored. AIMS: In the present paper we studied the relationship between obesity and its metabolic correlates and nephrolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 478 Caucasian subjects having BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. The presence of nephrolithiasis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were noted. They underwent measurements of anthropometry (BMI and waist circumference, body composition), serum variables (fasting glucose, serum lipids and serum enzymes) and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) nutritional questionnaire. RESULTS: 45 (9.4%) participants were stone formers. Subjects with high serum concentrations of triglycerides (≥150 mg/dl), fasting glucose (> 100 mg/dl) and AST (>30 U/I in F or >40 U/I in M) were more frequent among stone formers than non-stone formers. Multinomial logistic regression confirmed that kidney stone production was associated with high fasting glucose (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.2, P = 0.011), AST (OR = 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-16.7, P = 0.033) and triglycerides (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7, P = 0.01). MedDiet score was not different in stone formers and non-stone formers. However, stone formers had a lower consumption frequency of olive oil and nuts, and higher consumption frequency of wine compared with non-stone formers. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese stone formers may have a defect in glucose metabolism and a potential liver damage. Some foods typical of Mediterranean diet may protect against nephrolithiasis.

Relevance of Mediterranean diet and glucose metabolism for nephrolithiasis in obese subjects / L. Soldati, S. Bertoli, A. Terranegra, C. Brasacchio, A. Mingione, E. Dogliotti, B. Raspini, A. Leone, F. Frau, L. Vignati, A. Spadafranca, G. Vezzoli, D. Cusi, A. Battezzati. - In: JOURNAL OF TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 1479-5876. - 12:1(2014), pp. 34.1-34.6.

Relevance of Mediterranean diet and glucose metabolism for nephrolithiasis in obese subjects

L. Soldati;S. Bertoli;A. Terranegra;C. Brasacchio;A. Mingione;E. Dogliotti;B. Raspini;A. Leone;F. Frau;L. Vignati;A. Spadafranca;G. Vezzoli;D. Cusi;A. Battezzati
2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Nephrolithiasis is more frequent and severe in obese patients from different western nations. This may be supported by higher calcium, urate, oxalate excretion in obese stone formers. Except these parameters, clinical characteristics of obese stone formers were not extensively explored. AIMS: In the present paper we studied the relationship between obesity and its metabolic correlates and nephrolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 478 Caucasian subjects having BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. The presence of nephrolithiasis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were noted. They underwent measurements of anthropometry (BMI and waist circumference, body composition), serum variables (fasting glucose, serum lipids and serum enzymes) and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) nutritional questionnaire. RESULTS: 45 (9.4%) participants were stone formers. Subjects with high serum concentrations of triglycerides (≥150 mg/dl), fasting glucose (> 100 mg/dl) and AST (>30 U/I in F or >40 U/I in M) were more frequent among stone formers than non-stone formers. Multinomial logistic regression confirmed that kidney stone production was associated with high fasting glucose (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.2, P = 0.011), AST (OR = 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-16.7, P = 0.033) and triglycerides (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7, P = 0.01). MedDiet score was not different in stone formers and non-stone formers. However, stone formers had a lower consumption frequency of olive oil and nuts, and higher consumption frequency of wine compared with non-stone formers. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese stone formers may have a defect in glucose metabolism and a potential liver damage. Some foods typical of Mediterranean diet may protect against nephrolithiasis.
kidney-stones; risk; prevalence; adherence; trial; fat
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
Settore MED/14 - Nefrologia
Centro Internazionale per lo Studio della Composizione Corporea ICANS
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/231166
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