New exciting developments on the occurrence and functional role of purinoceptors in mammalian brain were presented at the session 'Purinoceptors in the central nervous system' chaired by Flaminio Cattabeni and Tom Dunwiddie at the Purines '96 international conference. The focus of the session were topics of recent interest, including the sources and mechanisms involved in ATP and adenosine release during physiological neurotransmission in hippocampus, the brain expression of the recently cloned P2 receptors, and the role of the various adenosine receptor subtypes in brain protection from neurodegeneration associated with trauma-, ischemia- and excessive excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. New important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the formation and release of adenosine into the extracellular space were provided by data obtained by Dunwiddie and coworkers in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These data may have functional implications for the role of purines in modulation of synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation in this brain area, and hence in cognitive functions. Buell provided an updated overview on the cloning, molecular characteristics and brain expression of various ligand-gated P2X purinoceptors; although the functional role of these receptors in mammalian brain still awaits elucidation, their widespread distribution in the nervous system strongly suggests that ATP-mediated events are more prevalent and important in brain than expected. Pedata presented data on the functional interrelationships between adenosine and glutamate in the brain, and also provided evidence for alterations of the reciprocal regulation between these two systems in aged brain, which may have important implications for both ischemia- and trauma-associated neurodegenerative events and senescence-associated cognitive impairment. Finally, von Lubitz provided novel data on the molecular mechanisms likely to be at the basis of the brain protective effects associated with the chronic stimulation of the adenosine A3 receptor, further confirming that this receptor represents a crucial target for the development of new antiischemic and antineurodegenerative therapeutic agents.

Purinoceptors in the central nervous system / T. Dunwiddie, M. Abbracchio, N. Bischofberger, J. Brundege, G. Buell, G. Collo, C. Corsi, L. Diao, E. Kawashima, K. Jacobson, S. Latini, R. Lin, R. North, M. Pazzagli, F. Pedata, G. Pepeu, W. Proctor, F. Rassendren, A. Surprenant, F. Cattabeni. - In: DRUG DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH. - ISSN 0272-4391. - 39:3-4(1996), pp. 361-370.

Purinoceptors in the central nervous system

M. Abbracchio;F. Cattabeni
1996

Abstract

New exciting developments on the occurrence and functional role of purinoceptors in mammalian brain were presented at the session 'Purinoceptors in the central nervous system' chaired by Flaminio Cattabeni and Tom Dunwiddie at the Purines '96 international conference. The focus of the session were topics of recent interest, including the sources and mechanisms involved in ATP and adenosine release during physiological neurotransmission in hippocampus, the brain expression of the recently cloned P2 receptors, and the role of the various adenosine receptor subtypes in brain protection from neurodegeneration associated with trauma-, ischemia- and excessive excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. New important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the formation and release of adenosine into the extracellular space were provided by data obtained by Dunwiddie and coworkers in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These data may have functional implications for the role of purines in modulation of synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation in this brain area, and hence in cognitive functions. Buell provided an updated overview on the cloning, molecular characteristics and brain expression of various ligand-gated P2X purinoceptors; although the functional role of these receptors in mammalian brain still awaits elucidation, their widespread distribution in the nervous system strongly suggests that ATP-mediated events are more prevalent and important in brain than expected. Pedata presented data on the functional interrelationships between adenosine and glutamate in the brain, and also provided evidence for alterations of the reciprocal regulation between these two systems in aged brain, which may have important implications for both ischemia- and trauma-associated neurodegenerative events and senescence-associated cognitive impairment. Finally, von Lubitz provided novel data on the molecular mechanisms likely to be at the basis of the brain protective effects associated with the chronic stimulation of the adenosine A3 receptor, further confirming that this receptor represents a crucial target for the development of new antiischemic and antineurodegenerative therapeutic agents.
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
DRUG DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/187173
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact