Female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) produce a single batch of eggs each year; synchronous growth of oocytes, all of which are ovulated at the same time, occurs in the two ovaries. To examine the regulatory mechanisms controlling egg size and number, virgin female rainbow trout were subjected to unilateral ovariectomy (ULO) during early vitellogenesis, and oocyte recruitment and growth in the remaining ovary were monitored. The study also set out to determine whether the presence of a second population of smaller oocytes in the maturing pool (induced by ULO) affected the timing of ovulation and/or the size of the eggs ovulated. Two months after ULO, there was no difference in the gonadosomatic index between ULO fish and controls. Compensatory ovarian hypertrophy resulted from the recruitment of a second population of primary oocytes into the vitellogenic pool. This population of smaller maturing oocytes in the ULO fish displayed growth rates up to twice those of the population of larger oocytes in the same ovary and of oocytes in controls. The growth rate of the population of larger oocytes in the ULO fish was not altered by the recruitment of a second maturing population. One month after ULO, fish had a lower concentration of plasma estradiol-17beta; than did controls; subsequently the concentrations of plasma estradiol-17β in the ULO and control groups were similar. After ULO, plasma levels of vitellogenin in the ULO fish did not differ from those in the control group throughout the study. At or close to ovulation, the fecundity of ULO fish was 75-80% that of controls. In the control group, oocytes appeared to reach a certain critical size before they were ovulated, and fish with higher fecundity ovulated later than their less fecund counterparts. ULO did not affect the timing of ovulation, and ULO fish ovulated eggs with a considerably greater size-range than did controls.

Different mitogenic capabilities of small and large granulosa cells isolated from bovine follicles / A. Luciano, G. Gaipa, S. Modina, M. Vezzoli, F. Gandolfi. - In: BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. - ISSN 0006-3363. - 54:1(1996), pp. 8-8. ((Intervento presentato al 29. convegno Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction tenutosi a London, UK nel 1996.

Different mitogenic capabilities of small and large granulosa cells isolated from bovine follicles

A. Luciano
Primo
;
S. Modina;F. Gandolfi
1996

Abstract

Female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) produce a single batch of eggs each year; synchronous growth of oocytes, all of which are ovulated at the same time, occurs in the two ovaries. To examine the regulatory mechanisms controlling egg size and number, virgin female rainbow trout were subjected to unilateral ovariectomy (ULO) during early vitellogenesis, and oocyte recruitment and growth in the remaining ovary were monitored. The study also set out to determine whether the presence of a second population of smaller oocytes in the maturing pool (induced by ULO) affected the timing of ovulation and/or the size of the eggs ovulated. Two months after ULO, there was no difference in the gonadosomatic index between ULO fish and controls. Compensatory ovarian hypertrophy resulted from the recruitment of a second population of primary oocytes into the vitellogenic pool. This population of smaller maturing oocytes in the ULO fish displayed growth rates up to twice those of the population of larger oocytes in the same ovary and of oocytes in controls. The growth rate of the population of larger oocytes in the ULO fish was not altered by the recruitment of a second maturing population. One month after ULO, fish had a lower concentration of plasma estradiol-17beta; than did controls; subsequently the concentrations of plasma estradiol-17β in the ULO and control groups were similar. After ULO, plasma levels of vitellogenin in the ULO fish did not differ from those in the control group throughout the study. At or close to ovulation, the fecundity of ULO fish was 75-80% that of controls. In the control group, oocytes appeared to reach a certain critical size before they were ovulated, and fish with higher fecundity ovulated later than their less fecund counterparts. ULO did not affect the timing of ovulation, and ULO fish ovulated eggs with a considerably greater size-range than did controls.
Settore VET/01 - Anatomia degli Animali Domestici
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/186128
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