The distinction between antemortem and postmortem wounds is one of the most important medico-legal problems. In fresh cadavers the macroscopic examination of haemorrhagic infiltration can be sufficient to reveal the vitality of a wound but in more difficult cases (putrefied corpses) histological and histochemical analyses need to be performed. The scope of this study was to detect the vitality of soft tissue samples in an advanced state of putrefaction using a monoclonal anti-human Glycoforin A antibody in order to evaluate the presence of red blood cells or red blood cell residues. Samples of skin wounds were taken from cadavers with a known time survival between trauma and death, and then submitted to a simulated putrefaction procedure. The skin samples were left to decompose for 30 days in air and in water and analyzed at a time interval of 3-6-15-30 days. These samples were stained with haematoxylin eosin stain, trichrome stain and with immunohistochemical stains. Results showed that in the air red blood cells could be seen for up to six days and granular deposits of Glycophorin reactive material for up to 15 days whereas no red blood cells were recognizable after 30 days. In water red cell putrefaction (or non-detection) was faster than in the air: after six days only amorphous granular deposits slightly reactive to Glycophorin could be seen. Nonetheless results showed that extravasated red blood cell residues can still be detected in skin bruises left to decompose in air and water, for up to at least 15 days in the open air and one week in water.

The use of the anti-Glycophorin A antibody in the detection of red blood cell residues in human soft tissue lesions decomposed in air and water : a pilot study / A. Taborelli, S. Andreola, A. Di Giancamillo, G. Gentile, C. Domeneghini, M. Grandi, C. Cattaneo. - In: MEDICINE, SCIENCE AND THE LAW. - ISSN 0025-8024. - 51:suppl. 1(2011), pp. S16-S19. ((Intervento presentato al 39. convegno National Congress of the Italian Society of Legal Medicine tenutosi a Ancona nel 2009.

The use of the anti-Glycophorin A antibody in the detection of red blood cell residues in human soft tissue lesions decomposed in air and water : a pilot study

A. Taborelli
Primo
;
A. Di Giancamillo;G. Gentile;C. Domeneghini;M. Grandi
Penultimo
;
C. Cattaneo
2011

Abstract

The distinction between antemortem and postmortem wounds is one of the most important medico-legal problems. In fresh cadavers the macroscopic examination of haemorrhagic infiltration can be sufficient to reveal the vitality of a wound but in more difficult cases (putrefied corpses) histological and histochemical analyses need to be performed. The scope of this study was to detect the vitality of soft tissue samples in an advanced state of putrefaction using a monoclonal anti-human Glycoforin A antibody in order to evaluate the presence of red blood cells or red blood cell residues. Samples of skin wounds were taken from cadavers with a known time survival between trauma and death, and then submitted to a simulated putrefaction procedure. The skin samples were left to decompose for 30 days in air and in water and analyzed at a time interval of 3-6-15-30 days. These samples were stained with haematoxylin eosin stain, trichrome stain and with immunohistochemical stains. Results showed that in the air red blood cells could be seen for up to six days and granular deposits of Glycophorin reactive material for up to 15 days whereas no red blood cells were recognizable after 30 days. In water red cell putrefaction (or non-detection) was faster than in the air: after six days only amorphous granular deposits slightly reactive to Glycophorin could be seen. Nonetheless results showed that extravasated red blood cell residues can still be detected in skin bruises left to decompose in air and water, for up to at least 15 days in the open air and one week in water.
human skin wounds; vitality; age
Settore MED/43 - Medicina Legale
Società Italiana di Medicina Legale e delle Assicurazioni
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/177800
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