Caseinphosphopeptides (CPPs) are considered as mineral carriers because of their ability to bind and solubilize calcium ions, with the possible role, yet to be definitely assessed, of improving calcium absorption at the intestinal level. Previous works demonstrated that CPPs improve calcium uptake, with increasing intracellular calcium concentration, by human differentiated tumor HT-29 cells, and that this effect correlates with the supramolecular structure of CPPs in the presence of calcium ions. The aim of the present study was to establish whether the CPP effect on calcium uptake is specific for HT-29 cells and depends on the differentiated state of the cells. To this purpose, HT-29 and Caco2 cells, two models of intestinal cells, were differentiated following appropriate protocols, including treatment with 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3. The CPP-dependent intracellular calcium rises were monitored at the single-cell level through fura2- fluorescence assays, and cell differentiation was assessed by biochemical and morphological methods. Results clearly showed that the ability to take up extracellular calcium ions under CPP stimulation is exhibited by both HT-29 and Caco2 cells, but only upon cell differentiation. This evidence adds novel support to the notion that CPPs favour calcium absorption, thus possibly acting as cellular bio-modulators and carrying a nutraceutical potential.

Caseinphosphopeptide-induced calcium uptake in human intestinal cell lines HT-29 and Caco2 is correlated to cellular differentiation / S. Cosentino, C. Gravaghi, E.B. Donetti, B.M. Donida, G. Lombardi, M. Bedoni, A. Fiorilli, G. Tettamanti, A. Ferraretto. - In: JOURNAL OF NUTRITIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY. - ISSN 0955-2863. - 21:3(2010), pp. 247-254. [10.1016/j.jnutbio.2008.12.016]

Caseinphosphopeptide-induced calcium uptake in human intestinal cell lines HT-29 and Caco2 is correlated to cellular differentiation

S. Cosentino;C. Gravaghi;E.B. Donetti;B.M. Donida;G. Lombardi;M. Bedoni;A. Fiorilli;G. Tettamanti;A. Ferraretto
2010

Abstract

Caseinphosphopeptides (CPPs) are considered as mineral carriers because of their ability to bind and solubilize calcium ions, with the possible role, yet to be definitely assessed, of improving calcium absorption at the intestinal level. Previous works demonstrated that CPPs improve calcium uptake, with increasing intracellular calcium concentration, by human differentiated tumor HT-29 cells, and that this effect correlates with the supramolecular structure of CPPs in the presence of calcium ions. The aim of the present study was to establish whether the CPP effect on calcium uptake is specific for HT-29 cells and depends on the differentiated state of the cells. To this purpose, HT-29 and Caco2 cells, two models of intestinal cells, were differentiated following appropriate protocols, including treatment with 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3. The CPP-dependent intracellular calcium rises were monitored at the single-cell level through fura2- fluorescence assays, and cell differentiation was assessed by biochemical and morphological methods. Results clearly showed that the ability to take up extracellular calcium ions under CPP stimulation is exhibited by both HT-29 and Caco2 cells, but only upon cell differentiation. This evidence adds novel support to the notion that CPPs favour calcium absorption, thus possibly acting as cellular bio-modulators and carrying a nutraceutical potential.
Caco2 cells; Calcium uptake; Caseinphosphopeptides; Cell differentiation; HT-29 cells
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Settore BIO/16 - Anatomia Umana
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/148155
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