Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are reportedly responsible for 50–60% of blood- stream infections in very preterm (<1500 g) infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Staphy- lococcus capitis is an increasingly prevalent pathogen in the neonatal setting, frequently causing central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) that can be difficult to eradicate. Central venous catheter (CVC) removal versus in situ treatment with CoNS CLABSIs is a controversial treat- ment strategy with no clear consensus. We reviewed all S. capitis CLABSIs in our NICU between 2019 and 2022, focusing on the role of catheter removal in eradication. Among the 25 patients, 17 CVCs were removed after diagnosis, leading to a 76.5% eradication rate in this group. Three infants had a persistently positive blood culture after CVC substitution. A new catheter was then inserted after a 48 h washout period, resulting in resolution of the infection. Only two of the eight patients (25%) who retained their catheter after diagnosis achieved infection eradication with antibiotic therapy alone. When feasible, catheter removal seems to be the most effective strategy for eradicating S. capitis CLABSIs, sometimes even requiring a 48 h washout period before reinsertion. Further studies on this topic are needed to better standardize the management of this type of infection.

Staphylococcus capitis Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Single-Center, Four-Year Experience in Central-Line Management during Sepsis Treatment / A. Sala, V. Pivetti, A. Vittorini, C. Viggiano, F. Castoldi, V. Fabiano, G. Lista, F. Cavigioli. - In: PATHOGENS. - ISSN 2076-0817. - 13:3(2024), pp. 234.1-234.11. [10.3390/pathogens13030234]

Staphylococcus capitis Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Single-Center, Four-Year Experience in Central-Line Management during Sepsis Treatment

A. Sala
Primo
;
V. Pivetti
Secondo
;
A. Vittorini;C. Viggiano;V. Fabiano;
2024

Abstract

Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are reportedly responsible for 50–60% of blood- stream infections in very preterm (<1500 g) infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Staphy- lococcus capitis is an increasingly prevalent pathogen in the neonatal setting, frequently causing central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) that can be difficult to eradicate. Central venous catheter (CVC) removal versus in situ treatment with CoNS CLABSIs is a controversial treat- ment strategy with no clear consensus. We reviewed all S. capitis CLABSIs in our NICU between 2019 and 2022, focusing on the role of catheter removal in eradication. Among the 25 patients, 17 CVCs were removed after diagnosis, leading to a 76.5% eradication rate in this group. Three infants had a persistently positive blood culture after CVC substitution. A new catheter was then inserted after a 48 h washout period, resulting in resolution of the infection. Only two of the eight patients (25%) who retained their catheter after diagnosis achieved infection eradication with antibiotic therapy alone. When feasible, catheter removal seems to be the most effective strategy for eradicating S. capitis CLABSIs, sometimes even requiring a 48 h washout period before reinsertion. Further studies on this topic are needed to better standardize the management of this type of infection.
LOS; CLABSI; CoNS; CVC; infants; S. capitis
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
2024
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
pathogens 2024.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Article
Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 493.78 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
493.78 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1039710
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact