Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19 and has brought a huge burden in terms of human lives. Strict social distance and influenza vaccination have been recommended to avoid co-infections between influenza viruses and SARS-CoV-2. Scattered reports suggested a protective effect of influenza vaccine on COVID-19 development and severity. We analyzed 51 studies on the capacity of influenza vaccination to affect infection with SARS-CoV-2, hospitalization, admission to Intensive Care Units (ICU), and mortality. All subjects taken into consideration did not receive any anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, although their status with respect to previous infections with SARS-CoV-2 is not known. Comparison between vaccinated and not-vaccinated subjects for each of the four endpoints was expressed as odds ratio (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs); all analyses were performed by DerSimonian and Laird model, and Hartung-Knapp model when studies were less than 10. In a total of 61 029 936 subjects from 33 studies, influenza vaccination reduced frequency of SARS-CoV-2 infection [OR plus 95% CI = 0.70 (0.65-0.77)]. The effect was significant in all studies together, in health care workers and in the general population; distance from influenza vaccination and the type of vaccine were also of importance. In 98 174 subjects from 11 studies, frequency of ICU admission was reduced with influenza vaccination [OR (95% CI) = 0.71 (0.54-0.94)]; the effect was significant in all studies together, in pregnant women and in hospitalized subjects. In contrast, in 4 737 328 subjects from 14 studies hospitalization was not modified [OR (95% CI) = 1.05 (0.82-1.35)], and in 4 139 660 subjects from 19 studies, mortality was not modified [OR (95% CI) = 0.76 (0.26-2.20)]. Our study emphasizes the importance of influenza vaccination in the protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Vaccination against influenza viruses reduces infection, not hospitalization or death, from respiratory COVID-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis / A. Pontiroli, F. Scovenna, V. Carlini, E. Tagliabue, J. Martin-Delgado, L. La Sala, E. Tanzi, I. Zanoni. - In: JOURNAL OF MEDICAL VIROLOGY. - ISSN 1096-9071. - 96:1(2024), pp. e29343.1-e29343.17. [10.1002/jmv.29343]

Vaccination against influenza viruses reduces infection, not hospitalization or death, from respiratory COVID-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

A. Pontiroli
;
F. Scovenna;V. Carlini;E. Tagliabue;L. La Sala;E. Tanzi;
2024

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19 and has brought a huge burden in terms of human lives. Strict social distance and influenza vaccination have been recommended to avoid co-infections between influenza viruses and SARS-CoV-2. Scattered reports suggested a protective effect of influenza vaccine on COVID-19 development and severity. We analyzed 51 studies on the capacity of influenza vaccination to affect infection with SARS-CoV-2, hospitalization, admission to Intensive Care Units (ICU), and mortality. All subjects taken into consideration did not receive any anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, although their status with respect to previous infections with SARS-CoV-2 is not known. Comparison between vaccinated and not-vaccinated subjects for each of the four endpoints was expressed as odds ratio (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs); all analyses were performed by DerSimonian and Laird model, and Hartung-Knapp model when studies were less than 10. In a total of 61 029 936 subjects from 33 studies, influenza vaccination reduced frequency of SARS-CoV-2 infection [OR plus 95% CI = 0.70 (0.65-0.77)]. The effect was significant in all studies together, in health care workers and in the general population; distance from influenza vaccination and the type of vaccine were also of importance. In 98 174 subjects from 11 studies, frequency of ICU admission was reduced with influenza vaccination [OR (95% CI) = 0.71 (0.54-0.94)]; the effect was significant in all studies together, in pregnant women and in hospitalized subjects. In contrast, in 4 737 328 subjects from 14 studies hospitalization was not modified [OR (95% CI) = 1.05 (0.82-1.35)], and in 4 139 660 subjects from 19 studies, mortality was not modified [OR (95% CI) = 0.76 (0.26-2.20)]. Our study emphasizes the importance of influenza vaccination in the protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.
covid-19; epidemiology; hospitalization; infection; influenza; influenza vaccination; influenza vaccine; intensive care units; meta-analysis; mortality; sars-cov-2; vaccines.
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
Settore MED/05 - Patologia Clinica
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
Settore MED/04 - Patologia Generale
2024
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmv.29343
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1023196
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