Background: Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection among infants and young children worldwide, with seasonal peaks in January and February. This study aimed to characterize the RSV samples from a pediatric cohort in the 2021–2022 season in Italy. Methods: In total, 104 samples were collected from pediatric patients attending the “Vittore Buzzi” Children’s Hospital in Milan, Italy in the 2021–2022 season. RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing were used to discriminate subgroups and obtain whole genomes. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic methods were used to analyze Italian sequences in the European contest and date Italian clusters. Results: The median age was 78 days, and 76.9% of subjects required hospitalization, with a higher proportion of patients under 3 months of age. An equal proportion of subgroups A (GA2.3.5) and B (GB5.0.5a) was found, with significant differences in length of hospitalization, days of supplemental oxygen treatment, and intravenous hydration duration. Phylogeny highlighted 26 and 37 clusters containing quite the total of Italian sequences for RSV-A and -B, respectively. Clusters presented a tMRCA between December 2011–February 2017 and May 2014–December 2016 for A and B subgroups, respectively. Compared to European sequences, specific mutations were observed in Italian strains. Conclusion: These data confirmed a more severe clinical course of RSV-A, particularly in young children. This study permitted the characterization of recent Italian RSV whole genomes, highlighting the peculiar pattern of mutations that needs to be investigated further and monitored.

Epidemiology and molecular analyses of respiratory syncytial virus in the 2021–2022 season in northern Italy / A. Lai, A. Bergna, V. Fabiano, C.D. Ventura, G. Fumagalli, A. Mari, M. Loiodice, G.V. Zuccotti, G. Zehender. - In: FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-302X. - 14:(2024), pp. 1-13. [10.3389/fmicb.2023.1327239]

Epidemiology and molecular analyses of respiratory syncytial virus in the 2021–2022 season in northern Italy

A. Lai
Primo
;
A. Bergna;V. Fabiano;C.D. Ventura;A. Mari;M. Loiodice;G.V. Zuccotti;G. Zehender
Ultimo
2024

Abstract

Background: Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection among infants and young children worldwide, with seasonal peaks in January and February. This study aimed to characterize the RSV samples from a pediatric cohort in the 2021–2022 season in Italy. Methods: In total, 104 samples were collected from pediatric patients attending the “Vittore Buzzi” Children’s Hospital in Milan, Italy in the 2021–2022 season. RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing were used to discriminate subgroups and obtain whole genomes. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic methods were used to analyze Italian sequences in the European contest and date Italian clusters. Results: The median age was 78 days, and 76.9% of subjects required hospitalization, with a higher proportion of patients under 3 months of age. An equal proportion of subgroups A (GA2.3.5) and B (GB5.0.5a) was found, with significant differences in length of hospitalization, days of supplemental oxygen treatment, and intravenous hydration duration. Phylogeny highlighted 26 and 37 clusters containing quite the total of Italian sequences for RSV-A and -B, respectively. Clusters presented a tMRCA between December 2011–February 2017 and May 2014–December 2016 for A and B subgroups, respectively. Compared to European sequences, specific mutations were observed in Italian strains. Conclusion: These data confirmed a more severe clinical course of RSV-A, particularly in young children. This study permitted the characterization of recent Italian RSV whole genomes, highlighting the peculiar pattern of mutations that needs to be investigated further and monitored.
respiratory syncytial virus; epidemiology; pediatric cohort; RSV subgroups; RSV genotypes; phylogeny
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
Settore MED/07 - Microbiologia e Microbiologia Clinica
   One Health Basic and Translational Research Actions addressing Unmet Need on Emerging Infectious Diseases (INF-ACT)
   INF-ACT
   MINISTERO DELL'UNIVERSITA' E DELLA RICERCA
   PE00000007
2024
4-gen-2024
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/1023008
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