Background. The impact of spontaneous portosystemic shunts (SPSSs) on natural history of cirrhotic patients was recently evaluated through the measurement of total shunt area (TSA), a novel tool that allows a comprehensive assessment of SPSSs extension, identifying a direct correlation of higher TSA with lower patient survival. The role of SPSSs in liver transplant (LT) is still debated: we sought to investigate the clinical impact of TSA on the development of early allograft dysfunction (EAD), acute kidney injury (AKI), postoperative complications, and graft and patient survival following LT. Methods. Preoperative imaging of 346 cirrhotic patients undergoing primary LT between 2015 and 2020 were retrospectively revised, recording the size and anatomy of each SPSS to calculate TSA. The impact of TSA and selected patient and donor characteristics on the development of EAD, AKI, and clinically relevant complications was evaluated through univariate and multivariate logistic regression, whereas their effect on graft and patient survival was investigated through Cox regression analysis. Results. A TSA exceeding 78.54 mm2resulted as an independent risk factor for the development of EAD (odds ratio [OR]: 2.327; P = 0.003), grade 3 AKI (OR: 2.093; P = 0.041), and clinically relevant complications (OR: 1.962; P = 0.015). Moreover, higher TSA was significantly related to early graft and patient survivals, emerging as an independent risk factor for 12-mo graft loss (hazard ratio: 3.877; P = 0.007) and patient death (hazard ratio: 2.682; P = 0.018). Conclusions. Higher TSA emerged as a significant risk factor for worse postoperative outcomes following LT, supporting the need for careful hemodynamic assessment and management of patients presenting multiple/larger shunts.

Clinical Impact of Spontaneous Portosystemic Shunts in Liver Transplantation: A Comprehensive Assessment Through Total Shunt Area Measurement / L. Centonze, G. Gorga, R. De Carlis, D. Bernasconi, A. Lauterio, L. Carbonaro, I. Vella, C. Sgrazzutti, N. Incarbone, F. Rizzetto, M.G. Valsecchi, A. Vanzulli, L. De Carlis. - In: TRANSPLANTATION. - ISSN 0041-1337. - 107:4(2023 Apr 01), pp. 913-924. [10.1097/TP.0000000000004391]

Clinical Impact of Spontaneous Portosystemic Shunts in Liver Transplantation: A Comprehensive Assessment Through Total Shunt Area Measurement

L. Centonze
Primo
;
G. Gorga
Secondo
;
D. Bernasconi;A. Lauterio;L. Carbonaro;C. Sgrazzutti;F. Rizzetto;A. Vanzulli
Penultimo
;
2023

Abstract

Background. The impact of spontaneous portosystemic shunts (SPSSs) on natural history of cirrhotic patients was recently evaluated through the measurement of total shunt area (TSA), a novel tool that allows a comprehensive assessment of SPSSs extension, identifying a direct correlation of higher TSA with lower patient survival. The role of SPSSs in liver transplant (LT) is still debated: we sought to investigate the clinical impact of TSA on the development of early allograft dysfunction (EAD), acute kidney injury (AKI), postoperative complications, and graft and patient survival following LT. Methods. Preoperative imaging of 346 cirrhotic patients undergoing primary LT between 2015 and 2020 were retrospectively revised, recording the size and anatomy of each SPSS to calculate TSA. The impact of TSA and selected patient and donor characteristics on the development of EAD, AKI, and clinically relevant complications was evaluated through univariate and multivariate logistic regression, whereas their effect on graft and patient survival was investigated through Cox regression analysis. Results. A TSA exceeding 78.54 mm2resulted as an independent risk factor for the development of EAD (odds ratio [OR]: 2.327; P = 0.003), grade 3 AKI (OR: 2.093; P = 0.041), and clinically relevant complications (OR: 1.962; P = 0.015). Moreover, higher TSA was significantly related to early graft and patient survivals, emerging as an independent risk factor for 12-mo graft loss (hazard ratio: 3.877; P = 0.007) and patient death (hazard ratio: 2.682; P = 0.018). Conclusions. Higher TSA emerged as a significant risk factor for worse postoperative outcomes following LT, supporting the need for careful hemodynamic assessment and management of patients presenting multiple/larger shunts.
Settore MED/36 - Diagnostica per Immagini e Radioterapia
Settore MED/18 - Chirurgia Generale
1-apr-2023
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/999029
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