In developed countries, congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is the most common congenital viral infection, representing the leading non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss (HL). Diagnosis of cCMV infection can be performed by detection of CMV DNA in urine or saliva within 2–3 weeks after birth, or later in dried blood samples on the Guthrie card. Currently, there are many controversies regarding the preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches to cCMV infection. HL secondary to cCMV is highly variable in onset, side, degree, audiometric configuration, and threshold changes over time. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to perform a long and thorough audiological follow-up in children with cCMV infection to ensure early identification and prompt treatment of progressive and/or late-onset HL. Early cochlear implantation appears to be a valid solution not only for children with bilateral profound HL, but also for those with single-sided deafness, improving localization ability and understanding speech in noisy environments. Moreover, the decision to apply a unilateral cochlear implant in children with cCMV is strengthened by the non-negligible possibility of hearing deterioration of the contralateral ear over time.

Congenital Cytomegalovirus and Hearing Loss: The State of the Art / M. Aldè, S. Binda, V. Primache, L. Pellegrinelli, E. Pariani, F. Pregliasco, F. Di Berardino, G. Cantarella, U. Ambrosetti. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 12:13(2023 Jul 03), pp. 4465.1-4465.13. [10.3390/jcm12134465]

Congenital Cytomegalovirus and Hearing Loss: The State of the Art

M. Aldè
Primo
;
S. Binda
Secondo
;
V. Primache;L. Pellegrinelli;E. Pariani;F. Pregliasco;F. Di Berardino;G. Cantarella
Penultimo
;
U. Ambrosetti
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

In developed countries, congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is the most common congenital viral infection, representing the leading non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss (HL). Diagnosis of cCMV infection can be performed by detection of CMV DNA in urine or saliva within 2–3 weeks after birth, or later in dried blood samples on the Guthrie card. Currently, there are many controversies regarding the preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches to cCMV infection. HL secondary to cCMV is highly variable in onset, side, degree, audiometric configuration, and threshold changes over time. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to perform a long and thorough audiological follow-up in children with cCMV infection to ensure early identification and prompt treatment of progressive and/or late-onset HL. Early cochlear implantation appears to be a valid solution not only for children with bilateral profound HL, but also for those with single-sided deafness, improving localization ability and understanding speech in noisy environments. Moreover, the decision to apply a unilateral cochlear implant in children with cCMV is strengthened by the non-negligible possibility of hearing deterioration of the contralateral ear over time.
congenital cytomegalovirus; hearing loss; single-sided deafness; cochlear implantation; vaccine;
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
3-lug-2023
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Congenital Cytomegalovirus and Hearing Loss_The State of art.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 352.79 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
352.79 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/985288
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact