Reprogramming energy production from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is now considered a hallmark of cancer. When tumors grow beyond a certain size they give rise to changes in their microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia, mechanical stress) that are conducive to the upregulation of glycolysis. Over the years, however, it has become clear that glycolysis can also associate with the earliest steps of tumorigenesis. Thus, many of the oncoproteins most commonly involved in tumor initiation and progression upregulate glycolysis. Moreover, in recent years, considerable evidence has been reported suggesting that upregulated glycolysis itself, through its enzymes and/or metabolites, may play a causative role in tumorigenesis, either by acting itself as an oncogenic stimulus or by facilitating the appearance of oncogenic mutations. In fact, several changes induced by upregulated glycolysis have been shown to be involved in tumor initiation and early tumorigenesis: glycolysis-induced chromatin remodeling, inhibition of premature senescence and induction of proliferation, effects on DNA repair, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification of target proteins, antiapoptotic effects, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition or autophagy, and induction of angiogenesis. In this article we summarize the evidence that upregulated glycolysis is involved in tumor initiation and, in the following, we propose a mechanistic model aimed at explaining how upregulated glycolysis may play such a role.

On the Role of Glycolysis in Early Tumorigenesis-Permissive and Executioner Effects / F. Marcucci, C. Rumio. - In: CELLS. - ISSN 2073-4409. - 12:8(2023 Apr 10), pp. 1124.1-1124.27. [10.3390/cells12081124]

On the Role of Glycolysis in Early Tumorigenesis-Permissive and Executioner Effects

C. Rumio
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Reprogramming energy production from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is now considered a hallmark of cancer. When tumors grow beyond a certain size they give rise to changes in their microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia, mechanical stress) that are conducive to the upregulation of glycolysis. Over the years, however, it has become clear that glycolysis can also associate with the earliest steps of tumorigenesis. Thus, many of the oncoproteins most commonly involved in tumor initiation and progression upregulate glycolysis. Moreover, in recent years, considerable evidence has been reported suggesting that upregulated glycolysis itself, through its enzymes and/or metabolites, may play a causative role in tumorigenesis, either by acting itself as an oncogenic stimulus or by facilitating the appearance of oncogenic mutations. In fact, several changes induced by upregulated glycolysis have been shown to be involved in tumor initiation and early tumorigenesis: glycolysis-induced chromatin remodeling, inhibition of premature senescence and induction of proliferation, effects on DNA repair, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification of target proteins, antiapoptotic effects, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition or autophagy, and induction of angiogenesis. In this article we summarize the evidence that upregulated glycolysis is involved in tumor initiation and, in the following, we propose a mechanistic model aimed at explaining how upregulated glycolysis may play such a role.
DNA repair; chromatin; glycolysis; oncoprotein; senescence; tumor initiation
Settore BIO/16 - Anatomia Umana
10-apr-2023
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/980670
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