Volume reconstruction from electron microscopy datasets is a tool increasingly used to study the ultrastructure of the synapse in the broader context of neuronal network and brain organization. Fine modifications of synapse structure, such as activity-dependent dendritic spine enlargement and changes in the size and shape of the postsynaptic density, occur upon maturation and plasticity. The lack of structural plasticity or the inability to stabilize potentiated synapses are associated with synaptic and neuronal functional impairment. Mapping these rearrangements with the high resolution of electron microscopy proved to be essential in order to establish precise correlations between the geometry of synapses and their functional states. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the substructure of the postsynaptic compartment of central excitatory synapses and how those are correlated with functional states of the neuronal network. The added value of volume electron microscopy analyses with respect to conventional transmission electron microscopy studies is highlighted considering that some limitations of volume-based methods imposed several adjustments to describe the geometry of this synaptic compartment and new parameters–that are good indicators of synapses strength and activity–have been introduced.

Exploiting volume electron microscopy to investigate structural plasticity and stability of the postsynaptic compartment of central synapses / G. Maiellano, L. Scandella, M. Francolini. - In: FRONTIERS IN CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 1662-5102. - 17:(2023), pp. 1153593.1-1153593.6. [10.3389/fncel.2023.1153593]

Exploiting volume electron microscopy to investigate structural plasticity and stability of the postsynaptic compartment of central synapses

G. Maiellano
Co-primo
;
L. Scandella
Co-primo
;
M. Francolini
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Volume reconstruction from electron microscopy datasets is a tool increasingly used to study the ultrastructure of the synapse in the broader context of neuronal network and brain organization. Fine modifications of synapse structure, such as activity-dependent dendritic spine enlargement and changes in the size and shape of the postsynaptic density, occur upon maturation and plasticity. The lack of structural plasticity or the inability to stabilize potentiated synapses are associated with synaptic and neuronal functional impairment. Mapping these rearrangements with the high resolution of electron microscopy proved to be essential in order to establish precise correlations between the geometry of synapses and their functional states. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the substructure of the postsynaptic compartment of central excitatory synapses and how those are correlated with functional states of the neuronal network. The added value of volume electron microscopy analyses with respect to conventional transmission electron microscopy studies is highlighted considering that some limitations of volume-based methods imposed several adjustments to describe the geometry of this synaptic compartment and new parameters–that are good indicators of synapses strength and activity–have been introduced.
volume electron microscopy (vEM); postsynaptic density (PSD); structural plasticity; dendritic spine enlargement; axon-spine interface; synaptic apposition surface; synapse; synaptic stability
Settore BIO/13 - Biologia Applicata
   A multidisciplinary approach to study protocadherin-19: from neuronal function to the “cellular interference” pathogenic mechanism
   MINISTERO DELL'ISTRUZIONE E DEL MERITO
   20172C9HLW_002
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/962619
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