Sex differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD) are often recognized from experimental and clinical studies examining the prevalence, manifestations, and response to therapies. Compared to age-matched men, women tend to have reduced CV risk and a better prognosis in the premenopausal period. However, with menopause, this risk increases exponentially, surpassing that of men. Although several mechanisms have been provided, including sex hormones, an emerging role in these sex differences has been suggested for β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling. Importantly, β-ARs are the most important G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), expressed in almost all the cell types of the CV system, and involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Consistent with their role, for decades, βARs have been considered the first targets for rational drug design to fight CVDs. Of note, β-ARs are seemingly associated with different CV outcomes in females compared with males. In addition, even if there is a critical inverse correlation between β-AR responsiveness and aging, it has been reported that gender is crucially involved in this age-related effect. This review will discuss how β-ARs impact the CV risk and response to anti-CVD therapies, also concerning sex and age. Further, we will explore how estrogens impact β-AR signaling in women.

Sex/Gender- and Age-Related Differences in β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Cardiovascular Diseases / D. Liccardo, B. Arosio, G. Corbi, A. Cannavo. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 11:15(2022 Jul 22), pp. 4280.1-4280.17. [10.3390/jcm11154280]

Sex/Gender- and Age-Related Differences in β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Cardiovascular Diseases

B. Arosio
Secondo
;
2022

Abstract

Sex differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD) are often recognized from experimental and clinical studies examining the prevalence, manifestations, and response to therapies. Compared to age-matched men, women tend to have reduced CV risk and a better prognosis in the premenopausal period. However, with menopause, this risk increases exponentially, surpassing that of men. Although several mechanisms have been provided, including sex hormones, an emerging role in these sex differences has been suggested for β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling. Importantly, β-ARs are the most important G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), expressed in almost all the cell types of the CV system, and involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Consistent with their role, for decades, βARs have been considered the first targets for rational drug design to fight CVDs. Of note, β-ARs are seemingly associated with different CV outcomes in females compared with males. In addition, even if there is a critical inverse correlation between β-AR responsiveness and aging, it has been reported that gender is crucially involved in this age-related effect. This review will discuss how β-ARs impact the CV risk and response to anti-CVD therapies, also concerning sex and age. Further, we will explore how estrogens impact β-AR signaling in women.
cardiovascular disease; G protein-coupled receptors; sex differences; β-adrenergic receptor
Settore BIO/12 - Biochimica Clinica e Biologia Molecolare Clinica
Settore BIO/13 - Biologia Applicata
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
22-lug-2022
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Liccardo-11-04280-v2.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.11 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.11 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/949420
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 9
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 8
social impact