Dysfunctions in liver metabolic activities may increase the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. In a cohort of community-dwelling older persons investigated for a suspected cognitive decline, we studied the association between liver status and dementia, considering sex and frailty contribution. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations, and the AST/ALT ratio were used to assess liver function in 419 older adults (248 persons with dementia and 171 age- and sex-matched subjects without cognitive decline). Although the serum concentrations of the liver enzymes were in the physiologic range, patients with dementia showed lower ALT concentrations (p = 0.005) and higher AST/ALT ratios (p = 0.003) compared to controls. The same differences were found when comparing men with and without dementia (ALT, p = 0.009; AST/ALT ratio, p = 0.003) but disappeared in women. Curiously, comparing women and men with the same diagnosis, the ALT concentrations were lower (p = 0.008), and the AST/ALT ratio was higher (p = 0.001) in control women than men, whereas no significant difference was found between persons with dementia. In conclusion, in our cohort of older people living in the community, the association between serum aminotransferases and dementia was remarked. Moreover, our results support attention to sex difference in liver function, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of dementia.

Liver Enzymes in a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Older Persons: Focus on Sex Contribution / E. Ferri, P.D. Rossi, M. Scichilone, T.A. Lucchi, B. Arosio. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 14:23(2022), pp. 4973.1-4973.10. [10.3390/nu14234973]

Liver Enzymes in a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Older Persons: Focus on Sex Contribution

B. Arosio
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Dysfunctions in liver metabolic activities may increase the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. In a cohort of community-dwelling older persons investigated for a suspected cognitive decline, we studied the association between liver status and dementia, considering sex and frailty contribution. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations, and the AST/ALT ratio were used to assess liver function in 419 older adults (248 persons with dementia and 171 age- and sex-matched subjects without cognitive decline). Although the serum concentrations of the liver enzymes were in the physiologic range, patients with dementia showed lower ALT concentrations (p = 0.005) and higher AST/ALT ratios (p = 0.003) compared to controls. The same differences were found when comparing men with and without dementia (ALT, p = 0.009; AST/ALT ratio, p = 0.003) but disappeared in women. Curiously, comparing women and men with the same diagnosis, the ALT concentrations were lower (p = 0.008), and the AST/ALT ratio was higher (p = 0.001) in control women than men, whereas no significant difference was found between persons with dementia. In conclusion, in our cohort of older people living in the community, the association between serum aminotransferases and dementia was remarked. Moreover, our results support attention to sex difference in liver function, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of dementia.
aging; alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; dementia; liver; sex
Settore BIO/12 - Biochimica Clinica e Biologia Molecolare Clinica
Settore BIO/13 - Biologia Applicata
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/949281
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