BackgroundCOVID-19 had an adverse impact on the management and outcome of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), but most available data refer to March-April 2020. AimThis study aims to investigate the clinical characteristics, time of treatment, and clinical outcome of patients at hospitals serving as macro-hubs during the second pandemic wave of SARS-CoV-2 (November 2020-January 2021). Methods and ResultsNine out of thirteen "macro-hubs" agreed to participate in the registry with a total of 941 patients included. The median age was 67 years (IQR 58-77) and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was the clinical presentation in 54% of cases. Almost all patients (97%) underwent coronary angiography, with more than 60% of patients transported to a macro-hub by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS). In the whole population of STEMI patients, the median time from symptom onset to First Medical Contact (FMC) was 64 min (IQR 30-180). The median time from FMC to CathLab was 69 min (IQR 39-105). A total of 59 patients (6.3%) presented a concomitant confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and pneumonia was present in 42.4% of these cases. No significant differences were found between STEMI patients with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection in treatment time intervals. Patients with concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infection had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those without (16.9% vs. 3.6%, P < 0.0001). However, post-discharge mortality was similar to 6-month mortality (4.2% vs. 4.1%, P = 0.98). In the multivariate analysis, SARS-CoV-2 infection did not show an independent association with in-hospital mortality, whereas pneumonia had higher mortality (OR 5.65, P = 0.05). ConclusionDuring the second wave of SARS-CoV-2 infection, almost all patients with ACS received coronary angiography for STEMI with an acceptable time delay. Patients with concomitant infection presented a lower in-hospital survival with no difference in post-discharge mortality; infection by itself was not an independent predictor of mortality but pneumonia was.

Acute Coronary Syndromes and SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Results From an Observational Multicenter Registry During the Second Pandemic Spread in Lombardy / M. Ferlini, D. Castini, G. Ferrante, G. Marenzi, M. Montorfano, S. Savonitto, M. D'Urbano, C. Lettieri, C. Cuccia, M. Marino, L.O. Visconti, S. Carugo. - In: FRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE. - ISSN 2297-055X. - 9:(2022), pp. 912815.1-912815.8. [10.3389/fcvm.2022.912815]

Acute Coronary Syndromes and SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Results From an Observational Multicenter Registry During the Second Pandemic Spread in Lombardy

G. Ferrante;S. Carugo
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

BackgroundCOVID-19 had an adverse impact on the management and outcome of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), but most available data refer to March-April 2020. AimThis study aims to investigate the clinical characteristics, time of treatment, and clinical outcome of patients at hospitals serving as macro-hubs during the second pandemic wave of SARS-CoV-2 (November 2020-January 2021). Methods and ResultsNine out of thirteen "macro-hubs" agreed to participate in the registry with a total of 941 patients included. The median age was 67 years (IQR 58-77) and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was the clinical presentation in 54% of cases. Almost all patients (97%) underwent coronary angiography, with more than 60% of patients transported to a macro-hub by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS). In the whole population of STEMI patients, the median time from symptom onset to First Medical Contact (FMC) was 64 min (IQR 30-180). The median time from FMC to CathLab was 69 min (IQR 39-105). A total of 59 patients (6.3%) presented a concomitant confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and pneumonia was present in 42.4% of these cases. No significant differences were found between STEMI patients with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection in treatment time intervals. Patients with concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infection had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those without (16.9% vs. 3.6%, P < 0.0001). However, post-discharge mortality was similar to 6-month mortality (4.2% vs. 4.1%, P = 0.98). In the multivariate analysis, SARS-CoV-2 infection did not show an independent association with in-hospital mortality, whereas pneumonia had higher mortality (OR 5.65, P = 0.05). ConclusionDuring the second wave of SARS-CoV-2 infection, almost all patients with ACS received coronary angiography for STEMI with an acceptable time delay. Patients with concomitant infection presented a lower in-hospital survival with no difference in post-discharge mortality; infection by itself was not an independent predictor of mortality but pneumonia was.
COVID-19; STEMI (myocardial infarction); acute coronary syndrome; coronary angiography; hub
Settore MED/11 - Malattie dell'Apparato Cardiovascolare
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/948448
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