Background and objective This study aimed to compare the prescribing patterns of paracetamol in COVID-19 with those for similar respiratory conditions and investigated the association between paracetamol use and COVID-19-related hospitalization/death.Methods Using a primary care data source, we conducted a cohort study to calculate the incidence rate of paracetamol use in COVID-19 and for similar respiratory conditions in 2020 and 2019 (i.e. pre-pandemic phase), respectively. In the study cohort, we nested a case-control analyses to investigate the association between paracetamol use and COVID-19-related hospitalizations/deaths.Results Overall, 1554 (33.4 per 1000) and 2566 patients (78.3 per 1000) were newly prescribed with paracetamol to treat COVID-19 or other respiratory conditions, respectively. Those aged 35-44 showed the highest prevalence rate (44.7 or 99.0 per 1000), while the oldest category reported the lowest value (17.8 or 39.8 per 1000). There was no association for early (OR= 1.15; 95% CI: 0.92-1.43) or mid-term (OR= 1.29; 95% CI: 0.61-2.73) users of paracetamol vs. non-users. Instead, the late users of paracetamol showed a statistically significant increased risk of hospitalization/death (OR= 1.75; 95% CI: 1.4-2.2).Conclusions Our findings provide reassuring evidence on the use and safety profile of paracetamol to treat early symptoms of COVID-19 as in other respiratory infections.

To clarify the safety profile of paracetamol for home-care patients with COVID-19: a real-world cohort study, with nested case-control analysis, in primary care / F. Lapi, E. Marconi, I. Grattagliano, A. Rossi, D. Fornasari, A. Magni, P. Lora Aprile, C. Cricelli. - In: INTERNAL AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE. - ISSN 1970-9366. - 17:8(2022 Nov), pp. 2237-2244. [10.1007/s11739-022-03054-1]

To clarify the safety profile of paracetamol for home-care patients with COVID-19: a real-world cohort study, with nested case-control analysis, in primary care

D. Fornasari;
2022

Abstract

Background and objective This study aimed to compare the prescribing patterns of paracetamol in COVID-19 with those for similar respiratory conditions and investigated the association between paracetamol use and COVID-19-related hospitalization/death.Methods Using a primary care data source, we conducted a cohort study to calculate the incidence rate of paracetamol use in COVID-19 and for similar respiratory conditions in 2020 and 2019 (i.e. pre-pandemic phase), respectively. In the study cohort, we nested a case-control analyses to investigate the association between paracetamol use and COVID-19-related hospitalizations/deaths.Results Overall, 1554 (33.4 per 1000) and 2566 patients (78.3 per 1000) were newly prescribed with paracetamol to treat COVID-19 or other respiratory conditions, respectively. Those aged 35-44 showed the highest prevalence rate (44.7 or 99.0 per 1000), while the oldest category reported the lowest value (17.8 or 39.8 per 1000). There was no association for early (OR= 1.15; 95% CI: 0.92-1.43) or mid-term (OR= 1.29; 95% CI: 0.61-2.73) users of paracetamol vs. non-users. Instead, the late users of paracetamol showed a statistically significant increased risk of hospitalization/death (OR= 1.75; 95% CI: 1.4-2.2).Conclusions Our findings provide reassuring evidence on the use and safety profile of paracetamol to treat early symptoms of COVID-19 as in other respiratory infections.
COVID-19; Home-care; Paracetamol; Prescribing pattern; Safety profile
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
nov-2022
30-lug-2022
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/948371
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