Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) arthrodesis as a measure of the Youngswick osteotomy survival, or any other secondary procedures in the long term follow up in patients with stage II and III hallux rigidus.Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 61 patients with stage II and III hallux rigidus who had undergone Youngswick osteotomy and analyzed their outcomes in the long term using first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis as an end point. The candidates for inclusion underwent clinical and radiographic evaluation, including the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).Results: Mean follow-up time was 54.8 months. All patients had improved their FAOS, with all achieving postoperative scores >75 points at the final follow up (P < 0.05). Although 49 % (P < 0.05) of the patients depicted worsening of the radiological aspect of the MTPJ, over the long time, no patient needed a first MTPJ arthrodesis.Conclusion: Our results show satisfying long-term outcomes with regard to function, pain relief, and patient satisfaction of the Youngswick osteotomy in grade II as well as grade III hallux rigidus that sustained over the follow up period; even in patients followed up for over 13 years. (C) 2019 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Youngswick osteotomy for treatment of moderate hallux rigidus: Thirteen years without arthrodesis / G. Slullitel, V. López, J.P. Calvi, R. D'Ambrosi, F.G. Usuelli. - In: FOOT AND ANKLE SURGERY. - ISSN 1268-7731. - 26:8(2020 Dec), pp. 890-894. [10.1016/j.fas.2019.11.008]

Youngswick osteotomy for treatment of moderate hallux rigidus: Thirteen years without arthrodesis

R. D'Ambrosi
;
2020

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) arthrodesis as a measure of the Youngswick osteotomy survival, or any other secondary procedures in the long term follow up in patients with stage II and III hallux rigidus.Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 61 patients with stage II and III hallux rigidus who had undergone Youngswick osteotomy and analyzed their outcomes in the long term using first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis as an end point. The candidates for inclusion underwent clinical and radiographic evaluation, including the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).Results: Mean follow-up time was 54.8 months. All patients had improved their FAOS, with all achieving postoperative scores >75 points at the final follow up (P < 0.05). Although 49 % (P < 0.05) of the patients depicted worsening of the radiological aspect of the MTPJ, over the long time, no patient needed a first MTPJ arthrodesis.Conclusion: Our results show satisfying long-term outcomes with regard to function, pain relief, and patient satisfaction of the Youngswick osteotomy in grade II as well as grade III hallux rigidus that sustained over the follow up period; even in patients followed up for over 13 years. (C) 2019 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Decompressive osteotomy; Hallux rigidus; Youngswick osteotomy; Adult; Aged; Female; Hallux Rigidus; Humans; Male; Metatarsophalangeal Joint; Middle Aged; Patient Satisfaction; Radiography; Retrospective Studies; Severity of Illness Index; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome; Arthrodesis; Osteotomy
Settore MED/33 - Malattie Apparato Locomotore
5-dic-2019
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/946877
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