Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent condition with onset in childhood and in many cases persisting into adulthood. Even though an increasing number of studies have investigated the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the management of adult ADHD, few authors have tried to identify the biological predictors of treatment response. Objectives: To summarize the available data about the biological markers of treatment response in adults affected by ADHD. Methods: A search on the main biomedical and psychological archives (PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and PsycINFO) was performed. Manuscripts in English, published up to May 2022 and having the biological predictors of treatment response in adults with ADHD as their main topic, were included. Results: A total of 3855 articles was screened. Twenty-two articles were finally included. Most of the manuscripts studied neuroimaging and electrophysiological factors as potential predictors of treatment response in adult ADHD patients. No reliable markers were identified until now. Promising findings on this topic regard genetic polymorphisms in snap receptor (SNARE) proteins and default mode network-striatum connectivity. Conclusions: Even though some biological markers seem promising for the prediction of treatment response in adults affected by ADHD, further studies are needed to confirm the available data in the context of precision medicine.

Biological Predictors of Treatment Response in Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Systematic Review / E. Capuzzi, A. Caldiroli, A. Auxilia, R. Borgonovo, M. Capellazzi, M. Clerici, M. Buoli. - In: JOURNAL OF PERSONALIZED MEDICINE. - ISSN 2075-4426. - 12:10(2022 Oct 20), pp. 1742.1-1742.23. [10.3390/jpm12101742]

Biological Predictors of Treatment Response in Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Systematic Review

A. Caldiroli
Secondo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
M. Buoli
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent condition with onset in childhood and in many cases persisting into adulthood. Even though an increasing number of studies have investigated the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the management of adult ADHD, few authors have tried to identify the biological predictors of treatment response. Objectives: To summarize the available data about the biological markers of treatment response in adults affected by ADHD. Methods: A search on the main biomedical and psychological archives (PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and PsycINFO) was performed. Manuscripts in English, published up to May 2022 and having the biological predictors of treatment response in adults with ADHD as their main topic, were included. Results: A total of 3855 articles was screened. Twenty-two articles were finally included. Most of the manuscripts studied neuroimaging and electrophysiological factors as potential predictors of treatment response in adult ADHD patients. No reliable markers were identified until now. Promising findings on this topic regard genetic polymorphisms in snap receptor (SNARE) proteins and default mode network-striatum connectivity. Conclusions: Even though some biological markers seem promising for the prediction of treatment response in adults affected by ADHD, further studies are needed to confirm the available data in the context of precision medicine.
adult; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); markers; outcome; treatment response
Settore MED/25 - Psichiatria
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
jpm-12-01742.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 519.17 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
519.17 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/946455
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact