Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration involves the activity of resident adult stem cells, namely satellite cells (SC). Despite numerous mechanisms have been described, different signals are emerging as relevant in SC homeostasis. Here we demonstrated that the Receptor for Activated C-Kinase 1 (RACK1) is important in SC function. RACK1 was expressed transiently in the skeletal muscle of post-natal mice, being abundant in the early phase of muscle growth and almost disappearing in adult mature fibers. The presence of RACK1 in interstitial SC was also detected. After acute injury in muscle of both mouse and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (used as alternative in vivo model) we found that RACK1 accumulated in regenerating fibers while it declined with the progression of repair process. To note, RACK1 also localized in the active SC that populate recovering tissue. The dynamics of RACK1 levels in isolated adult SC of mice, i.e., progressively high during differentiation and low compared to proliferating conditions, and RACK1 silencing indicated that RACK1 promotes both the formation of myotubes and the accretion of nascent myotubes. In Drosophila with depleted RACK1 in all muscle cells or, specifically, in SC lineage we observed a delayed recovery of skeletal muscle after physical damage as well as the low presence of active SC in the wound area. Our results also suggest the coupling of RACK1 to muscle unfolded protein response during SC activation. Collectively, we provided the first evidence that transient levels of the evolutionarily conserved factor RACK1 are critical for adult SC activation and proper skeletal muscle regeneration, favoring the efficient progression of SC from a committed to a fully differentiated state.

RACK1 is evolutionary conserved in satellite stem cell activation and adult skeletal muscle regeneration / E. Catalani, S. Zecchini, M. Giovarelli, A. Cherubini, S. Del Quondam, K. Brunetti, F. Silvestri, P. Roux-Biejat, A. Napoli, S.R. Casati, M. Ceci, N. Romano, S. Bongiorni, G. Prantera, E. Clementi, C. Perrotta, C. De Palma, D. Cervia. - In: CELL DEATH DISCOVERY. - ISSN 2058-7716. - 8:1(2022), pp. 1-14. [10.1038/s41420-022-01250-8]

RACK1 is evolutionary conserved in satellite stem cell activation and adult skeletal muscle regeneration

S. Zecchini;M. Giovarelli;P. Roux-Biejat;A. Napoli;S.R. Casati;M. Ceci;E. Clementi;C. Perrotta;C. De Palma
Penultimo
;
2022

Abstract

Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration involves the activity of resident adult stem cells, namely satellite cells (SC). Despite numerous mechanisms have been described, different signals are emerging as relevant in SC homeostasis. Here we demonstrated that the Receptor for Activated C-Kinase 1 (RACK1) is important in SC function. RACK1 was expressed transiently in the skeletal muscle of post-natal mice, being abundant in the early phase of muscle growth and almost disappearing in adult mature fibers. The presence of RACK1 in interstitial SC was also detected. After acute injury in muscle of both mouse and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (used as alternative in vivo model) we found that RACK1 accumulated in regenerating fibers while it declined with the progression of repair process. To note, RACK1 also localized in the active SC that populate recovering tissue. The dynamics of RACK1 levels in isolated adult SC of mice, i.e., progressively high during differentiation and low compared to proliferating conditions, and RACK1 silencing indicated that RACK1 promotes both the formation of myotubes and the accretion of nascent myotubes. In Drosophila with depleted RACK1 in all muscle cells or, specifically, in SC lineage we observed a delayed recovery of skeletal muscle after physical damage as well as the low presence of active SC in the wound area. Our results also suggest the coupling of RACK1 to muscle unfolded protein response during SC activation. Collectively, we provided the first evidence that transient levels of the evolutionarily conserved factor RACK1 are critical for adult SC activation and proper skeletal muscle regeneration, favoring the efficient progression of SC from a committed to a fully differentiated state.
Settore BIO/17 - Istologia
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/946334
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