The decision of whether to operate on elderly patients with brain tumors is complex, and influenced by pathology-related and patient-specific factors. This retrospective cohort study, based on a prospectively collected surgical database, aims at identifying possible factors predicting clinical worsening after elective neuro-oncological surgery in elderly patients. Therefore, all patients ≥65 years old who underwent BT resection at a tertiary referral center between 01/2018 and 12/2019 were included. Age, smoking, previous radiotherapy, hypertension, preoperative functional status, complications occurrence, surgical complexity and the presence of comorbidities were prospectively collected and analyzed at discharge and the 3-month follow-up. The series included 143 patients (mean 71 years, range 65–86). Sixty-five patients (46%) had at least one neurosurgical complication, whereas 48/65 (74%) complications did not require invasive treatment. Forty-two patients (29.4%) worsened at discharge; these patients had a greater number of complications compared to patients with unchanged/improved performance status. A persistent worsening at three months of follow-up was noted in 20.3% of patients; again, this subgroup presented more complications than patients who remained equal or improved. Therefore, postoperative complications and surgical complexity seem to influence significantly the early outcome in elderly patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. In contrast, postoperative complications alone are the only factor with an impact on the 3-month follow-up.

Brain tumor resection in elderly patients: Potential factors of postoperative worsening in a predictive outcome model / P. Ferroli, I.G. Vetrano, S. Schiavolin, F. Acerbi, C.M. Zattra, M. Schiariti, M. Leonardi, M. Broggi. - In: CANCERS. - ISSN 2072-6694. - 13:10(2021 May 12), pp. 2320.1-2320.12. [10.3390/cancers13102320]

Brain tumor resection in elderly patients: Potential factors of postoperative worsening in a predictive outcome model

I.G. Vetrano
Co-primo
;
F. Acerbi;M. Schiariti;M. Broggi
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

The decision of whether to operate on elderly patients with brain tumors is complex, and influenced by pathology-related and patient-specific factors. This retrospective cohort study, based on a prospectively collected surgical database, aims at identifying possible factors predicting clinical worsening after elective neuro-oncological surgery in elderly patients. Therefore, all patients ≥65 years old who underwent BT resection at a tertiary referral center between 01/2018 and 12/2019 were included. Age, smoking, previous radiotherapy, hypertension, preoperative functional status, complications occurrence, surgical complexity and the presence of comorbidities were prospectively collected and analyzed at discharge and the 3-month follow-up. The series included 143 patients (mean 71 years, range 65–86). Sixty-five patients (46%) had at least one neurosurgical complication, whereas 48/65 (74%) complications did not require invasive treatment. Forty-two patients (29.4%) worsened at discharge; these patients had a greater number of complications compared to patients with unchanged/improved performance status. A persistent worsening at three months of follow-up was noted in 20.3% of patients; again, this subgroup presented more complications than patients who remained equal or improved. Therefore, postoperative complications and surgical complexity seem to influence significantly the early outcome in elderly patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. In contrast, postoperative complications alone are the only factor with an impact on the 3-month follow-up.
Brain tumors; Complications; Craniotomy; Elderly; KPS; Mortality; Outcome; Predicting factors
Settore MED/27 - Neurochirurgia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/945413
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