Knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability in old subjects. Pain may predispose to the development of frailty. Studies on mechanisms underlying pain in osteoarthritis models during aging are lacking. In this work, we used the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis in adult (11-week-old) and old (20-month-old) C57BL/6J mice to compare hypersensitivity, locomotion, neuroinflammation, and the effects of morphine treatment. After osteoarthritis induction in adult and old mice, weight-bearing asymmetry, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia similarly developed, while locomotion and frailty were more affected in old than in adult animals. When behavioral deficits were present, the animals were treated for 7 days with morphine. This opioid counteracts the behavioral alterations and the frailty index worsening both in adult and old mice. To address the mechanisms that underlie pain, we evaluated neuroinflammatory markers and proinflammatory cytokine expression in the sciatic nerve, DRGs, and spinal cord. Overexpression of cytokines and glia markers were present in osteoarthritis adult and old mice, but the activation was qualitatively and quantitatively more evident in aged mice. Morphine was able to counteract neuroinflammation in both age groups. We demonstrate that old mice are more vulnerable to pain’s detrimental effects, but prompt treatment is successful at mitigating these effects.

Osteoarthritis pain in old mice aggravates neuroinflammation and frailty: the positive effect of morphine treatment / G. Amodeo, S. Franchi, G. Galimberti, L. Comi, S. D’Agnelli, M. Baciarello, E. Giovanna Bignami, P.G. Sacerdote. - In: BIOMEDICINES. - ISSN 2227-9059. - 10:11(2022), pp. 2847.1-2847.19. [10.3390/biomedicines10112847]

Osteoarthritis pain in old mice aggravates neuroinflammation and frailty: the positive effect of morphine treatment

G. Amodeo
Primo
;
S. Franchi
Secondo
;
G. Galimberti;L. Comi;P.G. Sacerdote
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability in old subjects. Pain may predispose to the development of frailty. Studies on mechanisms underlying pain in osteoarthritis models during aging are lacking. In this work, we used the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis in adult (11-week-old) and old (20-month-old) C57BL/6J mice to compare hypersensitivity, locomotion, neuroinflammation, and the effects of morphine treatment. After osteoarthritis induction in adult and old mice, weight-bearing asymmetry, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia similarly developed, while locomotion and frailty were more affected in old than in adult animals. When behavioral deficits were present, the animals were treated for 7 days with morphine. This opioid counteracts the behavioral alterations and the frailty index worsening both in adult and old mice. To address the mechanisms that underlie pain, we evaluated neuroinflammatory markers and proinflammatory cytokine expression in the sciatic nerve, DRGs, and spinal cord. Overexpression of cytokines and glia markers were present in osteoarthritis adult and old mice, but the activation was qualitatively and quantitatively more evident in aged mice. Morphine was able to counteract neuroinflammation in both age groups. We demonstrate that old mice are more vulnerable to pain’s detrimental effects, but prompt treatment is successful at mitigating these effects.
aging; allodynia; frailty; hyperalgesia; locomotor activity; monoiodoacetate; morphine; neuroinflammation; osteoarthritis pain
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
Settore MED/41 - Anestesiologia
CAR_RIC18PSACE_01 - Treating pain to modulate frailty: a bench to bedside mechanism based model - SACERDOTE, PAOLA GIUSEPPINA - CAR_RIC - Bandi Fondazione Cariplo - 2018
8-nov-2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/944954
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