Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome due to a phosphaturic tumor, which overproduces Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 (FGF-23), causing hyperphosphaturia, hypophosphatemia, low 1,25 (OH)2D and osteomalacia. Tumor localization is critical, diagnostic delay ranges from 2.5 to 28 years and to date surgical removal is considered effective treatment. We retrospectively evaluated patients with definite diagnosis of TIO referred to a tertiary Rheumatology Center between September 2000 and May 2020, investigating clinical management and disease outcome. We included 17 patients: 10 (58.8%) were females, mean age at diagnosis was 55.3 +/- 13.9 years (mean +/- standard deviation), with a diagnostic delay from symptoms onset to tumor detection of 6.6 +/- 6.25 years. Biochemical data were: serum phosphorus 1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/dL (Reference Range: 2.5-4.6), serum 1,25(OH)2D 31.8 +/- 22.9 ng/mL (RR: 25-86), intact FGF-23, 358.9 +/- 677 pg/mL (RR: 25-45); 24 hUrine Phosphorus was increased in only 2 patients, while tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) was decreased in all patients confirming a renal phosphate wasting. In 2013 68Ga- DOTA-based PET/CT was introduced in routinely practice and diagnostic delay was consistently reduced (from 8.6 +/- 7.9 to 4.3 +/- 2.4 years). Thirteen patients underwent surgery, one patient underwent radiofrequency ablation; 3 patients, not eligible for surgery, were treated only with supplements of phosphorus and calcitriol. One was started on Burosumab after several unsuccessful surgical attempts. After surgery or ablation, 8 patients had complete remission, 3 TIO persistence, and 3 had overtime relapse. Relapses were observed only in patients who previously underwent closed biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the widest European cohort of TIO patients in the last two decades. We confirm a usual diagnostic delay and recommend a stepwise diagnostic approach. Tumor biopsy is not recommended due to the potential cell spilling. Surgery is generally considered a definitive treatment, even though other approaches have been successful in curing TIO. Active surveillance on possible recurrence is always needed. Burosumab appears a promising therapy.

Tumor induced osteomalacia: A single center experience on 17 patients / C. Crotti, F. Bartoli, L.A. Coletto, M. Manara, E. Marini, P.A. Daolio, A. Parafioriti, E. Armiraglio, F. Zucchi, L. Sinigaglia, R. Caporali, M. Varenna. - In: BONE. - ISSN 8756-3282. - 152:(2021), pp. 116077.1-116077.8. [10.1016/j.bone.2021.116077]

Tumor induced osteomalacia: A single center experience on 17 patients

C. Crotti
Primo
;
F. Bartoli
Secondo
;
L.A. Coletto;M. Manara;E. Marini;R. Caporali
Penultimo
;
2021

Abstract

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome due to a phosphaturic tumor, which overproduces Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 (FGF-23), causing hyperphosphaturia, hypophosphatemia, low 1,25 (OH)2D and osteomalacia. Tumor localization is critical, diagnostic delay ranges from 2.5 to 28 years and to date surgical removal is considered effective treatment. We retrospectively evaluated patients with definite diagnosis of TIO referred to a tertiary Rheumatology Center between September 2000 and May 2020, investigating clinical management and disease outcome. We included 17 patients: 10 (58.8%) were females, mean age at diagnosis was 55.3 +/- 13.9 years (mean +/- standard deviation), with a diagnostic delay from symptoms onset to tumor detection of 6.6 +/- 6.25 years. Biochemical data were: serum phosphorus 1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/dL (Reference Range: 2.5-4.6), serum 1,25(OH)2D 31.8 +/- 22.9 ng/mL (RR: 25-86), intact FGF-23, 358.9 +/- 677 pg/mL (RR: 25-45); 24 hUrine Phosphorus was increased in only 2 patients, while tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) was decreased in all patients confirming a renal phosphate wasting. In 2013 68Ga- DOTA-based PET/CT was introduced in routinely practice and diagnostic delay was consistently reduced (from 8.6 +/- 7.9 to 4.3 +/- 2.4 years). Thirteen patients underwent surgery, one patient underwent radiofrequency ablation; 3 patients, not eligible for surgery, were treated only with supplements of phosphorus and calcitriol. One was started on Burosumab after several unsuccessful surgical attempts. After surgery or ablation, 8 patients had complete remission, 3 TIO persistence, and 3 had overtime relapse. Relapses were observed only in patients who previously underwent closed biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the widest European cohort of TIO patients in the last two decades. We confirm a usual diagnostic delay and recommend a stepwise diagnostic approach. Tumor biopsy is not recommended due to the potential cell spilling. Surgery is generally considered a definitive treatment, even though other approaches have been successful in curing TIO. Active surveillance on possible recurrence is always needed. Burosumab appears a promising therapy.
FGF23; Osteomalacia; Tumor-induced bone disease; Adult; Aged; Delayed Diagnosis; Female; Fibroblast Growth Factor-23; Fibroblast Growth Factors; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Paraneoplastic Syndromes; Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography; Retrospective Studies; Hypophosphatemia; Neoplasms, Connective Tissue; Osteomalacia
Settore MED/16 - Reumatologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/943120
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