Birth weight (bW) is considered an indicator of neonatal maturity and a predictor of neonatal mortality. According to its importance, many efforts have been made so far to identify physiological body weight ranges at birth. Due to the high heterogeneity among breeds, optimal bW is difficult to define in dogs. The aim of this study was to carefully analyze the shape and pattern of the bW distribution in dogs. Furthermore, the role of breed on bW determination was specifically investigated in relation to maternal (age, weight, height, diet, season, litter size) and neonatal (sex, malformations, assistance at birth) aspects. For these purposes two canine breeds with very similar phenotypic characteristics, Golden and Labrador retrievers, were selected. An accurate statistical model to explore bW distribution and compare it between Goldens and Labradors was developed. At birth most of the Golden and Labrador pups (estimated 95th percentile) weighed up to 630 g and 500 g, respectively. The estimated 5th percentile of bW distributions was 295 g in Golden and 290 g in Labrador pups. These lowest values could be indicative cut-offs of underweight pups. The probability of neonatal mortality within 1 week of life decreased with increasing bW (P = 0.031) and was higher in Golden than Labrador pups even though this difference was not significant. In conclusion, our results suggest that genetics have a relevant influence on the determination of birth weight which is confirmed to be closely associated with neonatal mortality.

Birth weight distribution in Golden and Labrador retriever dogs: A similar morphotype with a different trend. Preliminary data / D. Groppetti, A. Pecile, F. Airoldi, G. Pizzi, P. Boracchi. - In: ANIMAL REPRODUCTION SCIENCE. - ISSN 0378-4320. - 245:(2022), pp. 107069.1-107069.9. [10.1016/j.anireprosci.2022.107069]

Birth weight distribution in Golden and Labrador retriever dogs: A similar morphotype with a different trend. Preliminary data

D. Groppetti
Primo
;
A. Pecile
Secondo
;
G. Pizzi;P. Boracchi
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Birth weight (bW) is considered an indicator of neonatal maturity and a predictor of neonatal mortality. According to its importance, many efforts have been made so far to identify physiological body weight ranges at birth. Due to the high heterogeneity among breeds, optimal bW is difficult to define in dogs. The aim of this study was to carefully analyze the shape and pattern of the bW distribution in dogs. Furthermore, the role of breed on bW determination was specifically investigated in relation to maternal (age, weight, height, diet, season, litter size) and neonatal (sex, malformations, assistance at birth) aspects. For these purposes two canine breeds with very similar phenotypic characteristics, Golden and Labrador retrievers, were selected. An accurate statistical model to explore bW distribution and compare it between Goldens and Labradors was developed. At birth most of the Golden and Labrador pups (estimated 95th percentile) weighed up to 630 g and 500 g, respectively. The estimated 5th percentile of bW distributions was 295 g in Golden and 290 g in Labrador pups. These lowest values could be indicative cut-offs of underweight pups. The probability of neonatal mortality within 1 week of life decreased with increasing bW (P = 0.031) and was higher in Golden than Labrador pups even though this difference was not significant. In conclusion, our results suggest that genetics have a relevant influence on the determination of birth weight which is confirmed to be closely associated with neonatal mortality.
Birth weight; Golden and Labrador retrievers; Neonatal mortality; Statistics
Settore VET/10 - Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologia Veterinaria
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/938935
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