Simple Summary Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a therapeutic technique with reported regenerative, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and analgesic effects. In the last few years, LLLT has been used in dogs for the management of different skin lesions and diseases. This study reports a literature review using the critically appraised topic (CAT) method to determine the canine skin diseases for which LLLT is an advisable treatment. Only primary clinical prospective studies were considered. A meticulous literature search revealed 19 significant clinical trials, and these were critically analyzed. The evaluation of the best accessible evidence in July 2022 suggests that LLLT can be a promising and effective adjunctive treatment in combination with systemic antibiotic therapy for canine interdigital pyoderma and canine deep pyoderma. Furthermore, the use of LLLT is not recommended as a therapy for pedal pruritus secondary to canine atopic dermatitis. In other canine skin diseases, there is a possible helpful effect of LLLT; however, the evidence for its use is not currently convincing. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a therapeutic option that stimulates cellular function through intracellular photobiological and photochemical reactions, promoting better tissue repair and an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and analgesic effect. Previous studies in human and veterinary medicine have shown the clinical efficacy of LLLT in many fields. In this study, the literature was reviewed using the critically appraised topic (CAT) method to determine the canine skin diseases for which LLLT is an advisable treatment. A meticulous literature search revealed 19 significant clinical trials, which were critically analyzed. The evaluation of the best accessible evidence in July 2022 suggests that fluorescence biomodulation (FBM), a type of LLLT, can, in combination with systemic antibiotic therapy, be a promising and effective adjunctive treatment for canine interdigital pyoderma and canine deep pyoderma. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that the use of LLLT is not recommended as a therapy for pedal pruritus secondary to canine atopic dermatitis. For other canine skin diseases included in the CAT, although LLLT appears to be a promising treatment, there is not yet good scientific evidence to recommend its use.

Critically Appraised Topic on Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in Dogs: An Advisable Treatment for Skin Diseases? / R. Perego, M. Mazzeo, E. Spada, D. Proverbio. - In: VETERINARY SCIENCES. - ISSN 2306-7381. - 9:9(2022), pp. 505.1-505.16. [10.3390/vetsci9090505]

Critically Appraised Topic on Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in Dogs: An Advisable Treatment for Skin Diseases?

R. Perego
Primo
;
E. Spada
Penultimo
;
D. Proverbio
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Simple Summary Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a therapeutic technique with reported regenerative, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and analgesic effects. In the last few years, LLLT has been used in dogs for the management of different skin lesions and diseases. This study reports a literature review using the critically appraised topic (CAT) method to determine the canine skin diseases for which LLLT is an advisable treatment. Only primary clinical prospective studies were considered. A meticulous literature search revealed 19 significant clinical trials, and these were critically analyzed. The evaluation of the best accessible evidence in July 2022 suggests that LLLT can be a promising and effective adjunctive treatment in combination with systemic antibiotic therapy for canine interdigital pyoderma and canine deep pyoderma. Furthermore, the use of LLLT is not recommended as a therapy for pedal pruritus secondary to canine atopic dermatitis. In other canine skin diseases, there is a possible helpful effect of LLLT; however, the evidence for its use is not currently convincing. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a therapeutic option that stimulates cellular function through intracellular photobiological and photochemical reactions, promoting better tissue repair and an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and analgesic effect. Previous studies in human and veterinary medicine have shown the clinical efficacy of LLLT in many fields. In this study, the literature was reviewed using the critically appraised topic (CAT) method to determine the canine skin diseases for which LLLT is an advisable treatment. A meticulous literature search revealed 19 significant clinical trials, which were critically analyzed. The evaluation of the best accessible evidence in July 2022 suggests that fluorescence biomodulation (FBM), a type of LLLT, can, in combination with systemic antibiotic therapy, be a promising and effective adjunctive treatment for canine interdigital pyoderma and canine deep pyoderma. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that the use of LLLT is not recommended as a therapy for pedal pruritus secondary to canine atopic dermatitis. For other canine skin diseases included in the CAT, although LLLT appears to be a promising treatment, there is not yet good scientific evidence to recommend its use.
photobiomodulation; low-level laser therapy; fluorescence biomodulation; photodynamic therapy; therapeutic laser; dermatology; dogs
Settore VET/08 - Clinica Medica Veterinaria
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/938170
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